salvaged church pews

Hi,
I recently purchased 16 , 15 foot long church pews made in 1929. The pews are joined in the middle and made out of white oak.
The seat section is made out of what appears to be a butcher block construction - strips about one inch wide. My question is, how strong is this type of construction versus solid wood? What is the value of this type of wood (1.5 inch thick x 19 inches wide x 7.5 feet long)
The back section of the pews is made out of 6 inch tongue and groove oak (approx 19 inches by 8 feet by 3/4). Any idea what the value of this would be? Is it a good choice for construction of armoires, chests, etc?
Thanks for the info.
Jack
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Very strong.
Are the pews flat or shaped for one's posterior?
Sounds like a great workbench top to me.
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Tue, Mar 6, 2007, 1:50pm (EST-3) snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com doth query: <snip> My question is, how strong is this type of construction versussolid wood? <snip>
As long as it's strong enough for whatever you want to use it for, what difference does it make. And ou that note, you failed to say what you wanted to use it for.
JOAT It was too early in the morning for it to be early in the morning. That was the only thing that he currently knew for sure. - Clodpool
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a butcher block

Every bit as solid and arguably a bit more stable.
What is the value of this type of wood (1.5 inch thick x 19 inches wide x 7.5 feet long)
Up here in the northeast, USA. oak runs about $3/board foot (that's 144 cubic inches). Your lamnated boards will be worth significantly less (for aesthetic reasons, finish would need to be removed, and the very specific sizes you have available). Recyled lumber is always more of a PITA to work with than virgin stock.
It has some value, but you're not sitting on a gold mine.

Same as above. Just a guess, but if you could get $1/bd foot you should take that and run. It's kind of like asking "what can I get for my 1972 Dodge Dart?". Mint condition would bring big $$ from a collector as would quarter-sawn white oak with fabulous meduliary rays displayed. Plain-sawn red oak laminated in thin strips covered in a grimy old finish and riddled with screw holes is more like the rusting hulk. It's more common too.
Is it a good choice for construction of armoires,

Yes. Oak is an excellent and a common furniture wood.
-Steve
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Before you saw them up, are they ugly, or do they include a fair amount of shape and decoration? In our are a lot of folks use these in family rooms, enclosed decks, entry halls, etc. They are a pretty popular item and disappear quickly at sales, and at a good price.
RonB

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Agreed! I've got a dozen or so here in NJ and people want to pay us a lot of $$$ for them... Sometimes hundreds for a single, somewhat damaged piece.
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Regards,
Joe Agro, Jr.
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