Salad Spoon

can anyone give me some ideas on how to scoop out the bowl portion of a salad spoon. carving is not an option as I have no carving tools and arthritic hands do not lend themselves to doing it that way. I need a way using some kind of power tools. thanks for any and all help.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"trvlnmny" wrote:

How about a dremel tool and carbide burrs?
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Dremel rotary tool.
R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Or one of these http://grizzly.com/products/Rotary-Grinder-w-Tool-Shaft/H6155
Which will take the flex shaft from one of these http://www.woodcraft.com/family.aspx?familyid=5541 My local woodcraft had a shaft sold separately. And yes, I put that fordham shaft on my griz and it works. And it's a lot better than the original.
And a Saburr Tooth bit http://www.saburr-tooth.com/toolsShank14.htm
I use the medium grit 7/8 sphere followed by the fine 78 to get it in better shape for sanding. I found a larger or coarser sphere is too aggressive.
Takes about five or ten minutes to zip out a bowl. Hope you've got a good dust collection system. Setting it up so I don't cover myself in sawdust is the longest step.
With that setup your biggest worry is hogging off too much wood before you realize it. Practice on scrap first. :-)
The saburr tooth bits are fantastic. They never clog and they hog off wood. I can't remember which of the dealers they list that I bought mine from. I also note that other rasp bits work fine, just not nearly as fast and take more effort.
I prefer the flexshaft because the dremel is so fat. Easier to do detail with the flexshaft. And the grizzly has lasted about three years now with no problems.
I bought one of those metal toolkit suitcases from Harbor Freight to hold it all.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
trvlnmny wrote:

4" grinder.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
If you don't have a dremel tool, you can pick up a wood rasp bit at the hardware store for your drill and try that. Also, its easier to shape the inside of the spoon on a secured flat board and then cut the spoon shape out around it afterward.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I went on a treenware kick and made spoons, spatulas, turners, mixers, and other goodies of all shapes and sizes.
Everything was a snap except spoons. It takes a while to carve out the bowls, which became pretty tedious. I went to Woodcraft and picked up one of these:
http://tinyurl.com/6kpj4x
and a finer, less aggressive cousin to cut down on the sanding. Dremels are too small and take forever. But these are 1/4" shank and can be mounted in a drill or handpiece. I made about 10 more spoons once I got this bit and it is still very sharp.
Robert
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I clicked on your link and got a
The Page Can Not Be Found.
??????
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

That link didn't work for me. I did some searching on the ID codes and found http://www.woodcraft.com/family.aspx?familyid 3&modetails#tabs, which I suspect is what you had in mind--140148 is I think the third item.
--
--
--John
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You are 100% exactly correct. Even the exact bit.
I thought the wrap would be too long and the link wouldn't function. So I used TinyUrl, but it goofed me instead.
Thanks for the correction!
Robert
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I know this isn't a power tool like you requested but I have used this to clean up a spoon after hogging out most of the wood with a rotary rasp in a drill. http://www.woodcraft.com/family.aspx?familyidH67 Art

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 24 Jul 2008 18:21:16 -0700 (PDT), trvlnmny

I have carved numerous spoons. I start with a block of wood, draw top and side views on the sides, then carefully cut one face with a bandsaw. Tape the pieces back together and cut the other side. The rest is done with carving tools and sandpaper. I'm sure you can use a Dremmel tool. Some sanding can be done with the Dremmel too, but finish up with hand sanding. With power tools you need a light touch--it's easy to remove too much or burn the wood.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

How about using a die grinder with a "ball-profile" router bit in it. I'd get a solid carbide one and carve out the inside of the spoon while held in a vise or clamped to a work table. regards, Joe.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.