Safety issues of wearing gloves when using power tools?

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Can someone point to sources online that document the safety issues of wearing gloves when using machinery or with woodworking power tools? thanks
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You'll have to do a little looking but www.osha.gov is a good start.
--
There are no stupid questions, but there are lots of stupid answers.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf. lonestar. org
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lumber. Take them off while cutting on the tablesaw. Use a pushstick and a featherboard.
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Common sense should equate that loose clothing near power tools is not safe.
With that said, gloves are more dangerous around some tools than others. Several years ago this topic came up and I performed an experiment with a TS and a canvas/leather glove. I used a stick to push this glove into the spinning blade several times. On no occasion did the blade grab the glove or move the glove. The blade simply cut the glove as long as I pushed it into the blade. When I stopped pushing the glove simply sat still with the blade running through it. I got the same results with both the leather fingers and the canvas cuff end of the glove. Having said that, I still do not recommend using gloves around most power tools. Accidents can happen.
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a loose glove fed by itself isn't too good at illustrating real world in-use conditions.
consider the blade slowed to near stalling by a bound board, like right before a kickback. add to that the glove being held stretched a bit by your sweaty hands in contact with the wood and the potential for unpredictable behavior from the objects in question go up a bit.
no gloves around machinery for *me*
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I'll say again,
Having said that, I still do not recommend using gloves around most power tools. Accidents can happen.
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To qualify a bit more, it is not likely a spinning blade will pull a glove in and especially if there is resistance. The glove is likely to be cut and cut much easier than wood. I still don't recommend a glove around a TS as the glove could get caught up on a guard, miter gauge, fence or what ever and your natural pushing motion could be detoured into the blade.
More dangerous IMHO are gloves around a lathe, drill press, or OSSander. Basically tools that can wind the glove up with you inside.
Gloves with a chainsaw, hammer drill, most portable sanders, etc.., not so bad.
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What about bench grinders? To me, they seem to be a safer tool with gloves than without.
Puckdropper
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Let your gut feelings be your guide.
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Leave the gloves for handling firewood. Re- read the safety rules for your equipment. I'm pretty sure that somewhere in there along with no loose clothing, jewelry, watches or ties, it also states no gloves! these rules are written for one reason: To protect you! (Also, if they protect you, they also cover their own butts against lawsuits from people foolish enough to wear loose items around moving equipment. Brian
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Bench grinders and sanders (stationary) are the worst. Glove gets puled between wheel and guard. Seen it a few times.

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Second that - especially when metalworking in welding gloves - not as much feel, you tend to rub up against the wheel too often, and as in kickback - when it grabs - it all happens very quickly.
No gloves for me..
8.9.10. phew.
Mike Brisbane Aus.

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Mike Richardson wrote:

Putting safety first means being able to count to ten without undressing.
When I worked in a one-man maintenance department, the 'safety inspector' would try to put a dime between the grinding wheel and the rest. If he succeeded, I got written up.
The other plants got written up so often they removed the rests. ;-))))
Bill
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http://nmwoodworks.com/cube


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While not entirely the same, I always wear gloves with my angle grinder. The sparks would burn my hands all up without them.
The grinder spins so fast I don't believe gloves or no gloves will matter. A cutting or grinding wheel doesn't have teeth so less likely to grab a glove.
Brian Elfert
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A cylindrical solid steel shaft doesn't have teeth either, yet I can personally attest that it can grab a glove and cause injury.
Please note that I am not arguing against your choice of wearing gloves when operating the angle grinder, I suppose that might be reasonable though when using one myself, I do not wear them.
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Make it as simple as possible, but no simpler.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf. lonestar. org
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Gloves also increase the size of your hands too and alters your spatial senses. That quck brush of a bare finger gets you closer with a glove over it.
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I'm damn sure not going to wear gloves after an incident on my CMS a few years back.
I had on a pair of those cheapie canvas/leather gloves. The blade caught the cuff of the glove and pulled it in slightly. I ended up not getting hurt, but I damn sure had to check my undies.
Briasn Elfert
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Brian Elfert wrote:

that would fit) pulled into a snag grinder many years ago. Fortunately it was already spinning down. Somebody spoke to me, I turned the grinder off, flipped open my face shield and grabbed for the grinder to change hands while standing up.
That's all it took.
I've gotten 'pink spray' a couple of times since ... but the grinder wanted the whole glove and-everything-in-it.
I'm not going to give a saw blade a chance.
Bill
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Front end of the blade cuts. Back end pulls things in, with potentially violent force. Perform the same experiment, but with the back end of the blade.
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Wed, Apr 18, 2007, 6:55pm (EDT+4) snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (trs80) doth burble: Can someone point to sources online that document the safety issues of wearing gloves when using machinery or with woodworking power tools? thanks
Yeah. I damnall sure value my body parts, so I don't wear gloves. You make your own decision.
JOAT I have anal glaucoma. I can't see my ass going to work today.
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