Safety-Guard SACRILEGE.

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wrote:

And vehicle accidents cause 50,000 Deaths ...
--
"He's not the Messiah. He's a very naughty boy! "
Brian's Mum
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Living in furniture manufacturing country, I would argue the opposite.
A person making the same types of cuts for hours at a time tend to get bored and then sloppy, and forget to be careful. Then the finger leaves the hand.
I think everyone would be surprised how easy you can get used to using guards, for most cuts.
--
Jim in NC


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says...

The thing is, if you're making the same cut for hours at a time, it's cost effective to make jigs and fixturing specific to that cut and to incorporate guards and to put up and take down the setup.
-. 0
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I see. Pros are more careful so they don't need guards, and pros are the only ones that spend enough time cutting that it is cost effective (again, skew word at work) for them to make guards, hence no one needs guards. Yep. Ironclad reasoning, fer sure.
R
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And never match wits in battle against a Sicilian?
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On 1/23/2011 4:05 PM, SonomaProducts.com wrote:

Anytime I see stats quoted by anyone, I wonder how they arrived at the number? Who did the counting? What was their objective. Saw Stop people count differently than Delta people, for example.
In any case, 31,500/year = .5 Every 9 minutes, not 1 every 9 minutes, making someone off by what, just 50%? Just saying...
--
Jack
4 million people die from second hand smoke every day....
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Not arguing with you, but if you're talking about accident rates I would imagine that most of the accidents occur when people are awake, right? So the 'day' is not 24 hours.
R
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"Jay Pique" wrote in message

The problem is perception, people who are doing unsafe things often perceive they're in no danger. That guy next to you on the freeway who has a cell phone in one hand and a coffee in the other, steering with his knee--he thinks he can get away with that because in his view he's a good driver--that something is about to happen two cars ahead that he hasn't foreseen doesn't enter into his perceptions. The same thing happens in the shop, like a hidden knot in a piece of wood that is about to cause a power tool to do something you didn't expect. I agree that paying attention and proper technique are vital to safety, but sometimes things happen that aren't necessarily your fault, and then it's nice to have a backup that keeps the blade out of your hand.
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In 40 years, I've seen lots of kickback, but never anyone getting bit. Not sticking your fingers into the blade is the best protection against having to relearn how to pick your nose. Splitters and pawls are a big help against kickback. So is keeping your machine tuned up -- a blade that heels in against the fence is liable to grab and fire a board like a rail gun.
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wrote:

In 40 years, I've seen lots of kickback, but never anyone getting bit. Not sticking your fingers into the blade is the best protection against having to relearn how to pick your nose. Splitters and pawls are a big help against kickback. So is keeping your machine tuned up -- a blade that heels in against the fence is liable to grab and fire a board like a rail gun.
Been there. Kickback with a 3/4 inch plywood about 16 inches square. Caught between fence and blade took off spinning and peeled a finger down to the tendon. Could watch tendon move as I bent my finger. 7 stitches in ER. THEN I bought the set of 2 pawls that hold wood down. Works great. WW
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The worst "kick back" (really the reverse) I've had was with my RAS. I was sawing into a 1" cedar board when it grabbed the blade and the carriage came at me. I had a few kicks when I was ripping with it, too. More than one board hit the wall. I've had no kicks on my table saw, yet.
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I will not rip with a RAS, and will not allow my students to rip with it, either.
In my opinion, there is not enough control of the stock while doing this, and far too many "bad things" can happen. It can pull your hand into the blade, or shoot the stock at you. I shudder when thinking about it.
--
Jim in NC
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wrote:

That's kinda why my RAS hasn't been used in 15 years[*], and why I bought the Unisaur.
[*] Thinking about it, it was last together before we moved *to* VT, in '93.
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Not trying to stir up too much crap, but as someone that uses a RAS to rip sheet stock on a fairly regular basis, I'm curious as to how you can have your hand pulled into the blade when ripping.
As I see it, on a TS, you are pushing a piece of wood into the spinning blade while using a fence to guide the stock and the blade sticks UP thru the material...on a RAS, you push the stock into the spinning blade, using a fence, and the blade is above the stock. With these set-ups, the TS pulls the material down to the table and the RAS pulls the stock up to the blade guard...so the same effect, really.
Mike
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--


Liberalism is a mental disorder
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On 1/26/11 9:08 PM, snipped-for-privacy@iname.com wrote:

I'm guessing he's feeding the stock the wrong way. :-)
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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"Morgans" wrote:

SFWIW, the local community college has some rather firm opinions about the RAS.
In their program, the RAS has ONLY ONE function.
The first step in preparing stock.
IOW, cutting rough stock to approximate length.
Just starting that beast got my extra special attention.
Lew
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On 1/26/2011 9:36 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

My sentiments exactly ... "beast" is a good description. Used a borrowed RAS to build a couple of recording studios way back when, and it was the only tool that I've ever used that I instinctively hated to walk up to.
I had no preconditioning for that feeling whatsoever, there was just something about a RAS that literally exuded danger to me ... still would if I had one.
To me, always been a tool of last resort if I couldn't use something else. Irrational? So be it ... it even surprised me when I thought about it ... go figure.
--
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A year or so ago I bought a Milwaukee sliding compound miter saw. I bought a Freud blade to go with it. (the Milwaukee blade sucked) No matter how many different ways I tried to cut with it, I got splinters, not bad but still......... I went back to my old Craftsman RAS with Freud blade. Now the Milwaukee collects dust. I would never try to rip with an RAS but it sure cuts a fine crosscut.
Max
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