Sad use of good wood

Last night I was watching "Dirty Jobs" on Discovery Channel. I missed the beginning of this segment, but tuned in on the guys microwave/vacuum kiln drying old growth river lumber. Cherry. Looked like they had a good 12" to 14" wide (and thick) slabs at least ten feet long. They used high tech equipment to find these logs.
Then the logs were sliced up into veneer and glued to particle board.
Breaks my heart.
- Owen -
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Owen Lawrence wrote:

If that's the same grey wood that Nahm used on a table project (reclaimed wood from the bottom of a river), the stuff was ugly to begin with and no great loss. It was wood from Mordor.
R
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RicodJour wrote:

Build me a chiffarobe worthy of Mordor!
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The grey stuff was from a peir or a rail road trestle that had been in I think salt water and had gone all grey and you're right it started ugly and ended that way too. The stuff like what the OP was talking about is found in the bottom of fresh water rivers and although the outer inch or so goes nasty the interior looks just like fresh sawn wood. They have some that you can look at at heartpine.com
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There is another company that does the same thing in the Great Lakes, salvage dive and recover of old growth logs that sank during transport from logging operations in the area. They plank or veneer depending on the type of wood, condition of log as a whole,etc.. If the cherry your talking about was birds eye then veneer would be more profitable.
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I don't what type of wood it was, but it was salvaged from the bottom of a body of water in Canada.

Don't know what type that wood was either, but Norm got that from a river in Virginia.
I've seen the episode of Dirty Jobs and the episode of New Yankee Workshop, and I remember the locations, but not what kind of wood was involved.
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: Last night I was watching "Dirty Jobs" on Discovery Channel. I missed : the beginning of this segment, but tuned in on the guys microwave/vacuum : kiln drying old growth river lumber. Cherry. Looked like they had a good : 12" to 14" wide (and thick) slabs at least ten feet long. They used high : tech equipment to find these logs.
: Then the logs were sliced up into veneer and glued to particle board.
Particle board, or MDF?
: Breaks my heart.
Why? Cutting it into veneer allows more of the wood's beauty to be seen. Some of the very, very best furniture ever made is veneered, and almost all modern veneer work is over a stable substrate, which means manmade sheet goods.
    -- Andy Barss
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I can well imagine a nice cherry sinker log, or any other of your more northern growing lumber types. Here in Louisiana we don't have your variety of sinkers, however sinker cypress, here, is prime for cabinets. It has a light greenish/gray tint to some of it.... Desirable and expensive.
Once or twice a year, I try to get to the Morganza Floodway and collect any trapped logs that has floated down the Miss. River. Sometimes I can find some nice logs, and more often I find some nice nature's art driftwood and burl pieces. Double pleasure: finding lumber and an enjoyable outing.
Sonny
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Andrew Barss wrote:

I know that veneering has been used in some great pieces of furniture, but I just hate it. No matter how well the veneering is done or how beautiful the veneer is, it's still just skin deep and looks cheap.
Dick Durbin
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