Ryobi biscuit joiner

Anyone have one of these they'd venture an opinion on? I see HD has them for $99. I'm an occasional small furniture sort of builder so it won't get a whole lot of use, however.......
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: Anyone have one of these they'd venture an opinion on? I see HD has : them for $99. I'm an occasional small furniture sort of builder so : it won't get a whole lot of use, however....... : I have the Ryobi biscuit cutter. It does what it's supposed to do and does it quite nicely. The fence isn't the slickest thing in the world to set up, but it does indeed do what it's supposed to do. Sure, it might well take a bit longer to set everything up compared to a PC unit, but it also costs half as much -- and cuts the same shape slot as the big bucks one.
I returned two (2) DeWalt plate joiners because of incredibly shoddy manufacturing workmanship before I bought the Ryobi.
I'm pleased to have a better tool that cost me *far* less. In fact, when I got the Ryobi last January I also got a Milwaukee Jig Saw at the same time -- and spent about the same amount of money for *both* tools as the Porter Cable biscuit cutter would have cost all by its lonesomes.
--
Steve
www.ApacheTrail.com/ww/
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Steve wrote:

========================Honestly it is hard to believe that the Ryobi is better then the two Dewalts that you had to return BUT stranger things have been known to happen....
Anyway I have been toying with the idea of buying a biscuit jointer even thought I have managed (quite nicely) to do without one for 40+ years ... And like the original poster I do not see my usage as being "heavy"...
I honestly have the tendency to buy the best I can afford but I am having some problems spending a few hundred dollars on a tool I will not use but a few times a year...Better off buying a workable lower end biscuit jointer and another Forrest Blade for one of the saws...
Same situation with the Router Raisers that are now being marketed...Heck I have had a Table mounted router (3 set up in the shop right now) for years and spending the money to save myself from bending over to adjust the bit seems like a a waste...
Bob Griffiths
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My Ryobi cuts a slightly sloppy slot though, although it works it's not as tight as the PC a friend has. But mine is lighter, cost half as much and for the amount it gets used is a good buy. I biscuit MDF with it fine, but I have had problems doing biscuit joints in crown molding with it and the PC worked fine for that.

Shhh! Our wives might hear you! :)
Jeff
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I have read on a number of news groups, including this one that Ryobi cuts a sloppy slot. Since I use biscuits for alignment not strength I find this to be a feature..
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On Tue, 29 Jul 2003 05:24:40 -0700, Rodger Podlogar wrote:

so you're saying you prefer sloppy alignment over accurate alignment? seems a bit contradictory to me...
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If a little play = accurate alignment, no biscuit at all would be even better.

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Rodger Podlogar wrote:

Huh? The idea of the biscuit is to keep the boards flush. With the slop in the Ryobi's cut it doesn't.
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA
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Hi John, I have that one too and it does a good job. As others have posted in the past the fence needs a little bit of fussing but I like the handle design and the hooked up to my shopvac I get no sawdust flying around. Gene

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I removed the dust bag and made a wooden deflector that slides over the exhaust port. The sawdust now shoots away from my face.
wrote:

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Thanks Gene, I'll probably get the Ryobi but have also been looking at the Craftsman Prof model as its on sale for $135. Problem is I could use that extra $36 to also buy the Ryobi 2hp plunge router ($99) that has gotten some nice reviews. SIGH - what to do...
Gene T wrote:

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Harbor Freight @ $69 and cheaper when on sale, and use the extra $30 + the $35 you were thinking about spending on the Craftsman and apply it to a Hitachi M12V 3 1/4 hp Plunge router? You can get them for $159 - $179 and you will hear tons of good reviews here for it. I love mine in a router table.
Digger
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You may want to consider looking at the Freud. I believe that they are the first who introduced the biscuit gizmo so they should be better than average.
I can't comment on Freud yet since it's still in the box waiting for a project.
Daniel Martin
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On Tue, 29 Jul 2003 08:23:36 -0700, D.Martin wrote:

http://www.huntfamily.com/metz/bj_history.htm
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Thanks for the link. Again proof that the net will provide you with just about any information that you maybe looking for. Possibly Freud may have been one of the first to commercially push the biscuit joiner in north america. But again I might be wrong on this one, notice I used the word "possibly".
D.Martin

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wrote:

You might consider looking at the Kreg pocket joiner system. Its not for everybody...but it has some advantages over biscuits in a lot of cases.
You can get a basic system for about $20.
I've used it several times...and am quite pleased.
Have a nice week...
Trent
Follow Joan Rivers' example --- get pre-embalmed!
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After investing in a biscuit joiner, about 4 dozen different clamps and waiting 30 to 45 minutes between glue ups I invested in the Kreg Pro system and haven't looked back. No glue up times, no need for a bunch of clamps, 10 times stronger than biscuits. If the pocket hole isn't going to show, it's the way to go..
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On Tue, 29 Jul 2003 05:33:32 -0700, "Rodger Podlogar"

And, of course, they sell plugs for the holes, Rodger. They come in about a half dozen different kinds of wood.
Just curious, Rog...
Do you do a glue up most of the time? I've done it both ways...glue and dry...and I don't see a whole lot of difference. I've been leaning toward the glue, though...most of the time. But, even dry, you sure get a nice, tight fit.
Have a nice week...
Trent
Follow Joan Rivers' example --- get pre-embalmed!
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projects.
As to using glue, when I first started with pocket holes I glued everything up. A few months ago my wife picked up a small stool at a yard sale for her dressing table. I believe it was originally designed for a child and it ended up broken. Well, OK, I sat on it. Went out to the shop to build a new stool; a quick and dirty weekend project. I sized a 3/4 piece of scrap ply for the seat and cut the legs and braces out of 2x2 scrap pine; sanded everything down and dry fitted it with 6 or 8 pocket screws.
The following day we had a big wind storm that damaged our gazbo and I spent the next 3 weekends repairing the gazbo. Getting back to the stool I slapped on 2 coats of paint, forgetting that I hadn't glued it up. The thing is rock solid. I weigh around 200 pounds, I sat on it, rocked back and forth several times and couldn't crack the paint at any of the joints..
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