Ryobi 18v Cordless Saw

This is my first posting so please don't rip into if I screw it all up. I purchased the 18 volt cordless saw several months ago. I've TRIED to use it three times each time with a full charge, sharp blade and gotten miserable results. This piece of crap won't even cut three inches of 3/4 plywood without coming to a complete overheated stop. The previous attempts were on 2x material miserable results as well. This stinking piece of CHEAP IMPORTED CRAP is right where it belongs. In several smashed up chunks in the garbage can. I'll NEVER spend a dime of my $$ on Royobi crap ever again! Oh reah after that tantrum I went and got my Bosch corded circ saw and it went through the plywood like grain through a goose! My question is are all Ryobi tools such dogs as the saw?
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On Sat, 23 Oct 2004 19:48:53 +0000, T Cooper wrote:

Sure hope you didn't have the blade on backwards!
-Doug
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Please give a guy a little credit, maybe I over stated the feebleness of the saw it actually cut about a foot before it gave it up.
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On Sat, 23 Oct 2004 20:03:25 +0000, T Cooper wrote:

I only mentioned it because it's happened to several folks here. I'm also guilty of cussing at bad drill bit/hard wood until I realized the drill was in reverse. Everyone is gonna have at least a few of these things happen if they play this game for years.
-Doug
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ranted:

Credit, after you broke the tool into pieces and tossed it into the trash? Uh, right.
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I look at "most" Ryobi tools as strictly entry level. That said I have one of the original portable planers and it is an AP10 Ryobi planer. I bought it in 1988 and it is still going strong. There is not any thing else in the Ryobi line that interests me now. IMHO battery operated tools are ok if they are a DRILL. Give me one with a tail for all other operations.
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Leon wrote:

Ryobi stuff is mostly junk, corded or not. I had a Ryobi made Craftsnam Professional router that was junk. Don't judge cordless tools because os a few bad names like Ryobi, I still have my 9.6v makita cordless circular saw and have cut through many sheets of ply with it. Cut all the 1/4" ply for the panels for my kitchen cabinets, cut some 3/4" plywood for a booth style table/chairs, cut MDF for a router table and even trimmed 3/4" treated plywood for my shed floor. The stock blade wasn't very good but I found a good carbide tipped blade for $20 and its been cutting just fine.
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Oh, I dont judge because of Ryobi, I judge because they lack the power compare to 110volts. I have used a battery operated PC and DeWalt circle saw and a recip saw. I'll stick with the ones with a tail.
I still

If you have no alternative to a battery operated saw, then I can see your point for using a circle saw to cut all those panels. I prefer to use the TS.
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Leon wrote:

I can barely fit a 4x8 sheet of ply in my garage, no way I'm going to balance it on my table saw. Sure a cordless saw/drill/whatever will be faster but after trying it cutting the ply on the back of my truck I have to hunt up 2 50' extension cords to reach and then drag them around the sides of the truck bed and such. Its much easier to pop in a battery and go make my cuts then put the battery in the charger when I'm done. I don't have to unwrap and untangle cords then wrap them back up and it takes much less work laying out a fence, I can clamp a thin scrap to the ply as a fence for the cut where with my big corded saw I have to clamp a thick strong fence and clamp it tight as the big saw if it hits a spot in the wood can move the fence if its not tight. Even though the cordless cuts slower I still get the job done faster since it takes less setup time. So even though you may not prefer them doesn't mean they are bad, they have plenty of uses and are sometimes even more handy even when a corded alternative is available.
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I really do not have a problem keeping up with extension cords or keeping them untangled.

OK, if that seems easier to you.
Snip
So even though you may not prefer them doesn't mean they are bad, they have

I guess some where you got the impression that I said battery powered tools are "bad". I merely indicated that other than a drill, corded ones are more powerful and my preference.
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Leon wrote:

Its mostly a space issue for me, I have to put everything away before my wife can pull her car in the shop. So it takes me time to pull the cords in and out each time I want to cut something. Your original post made it sound like you think cordless tools are worthless for anything but drill and I'm just saying it depends on the person and what you want to do with them. I find my cordless get used far more often than my corded tools though a kitchen remodel including making my own countertop and cabinets and table and chairs, bathroom remodel, vanity for my wife, etc. The only corded tool that gets used more is my new PC router, but I've been extremely tempted to buy their battery one as well so I can leave the corded in the router table.
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Nah, they are far from the best, but it should work OK when new I have the 14.4 volt saw and until the batteries started to die, it worked fairly well for quick trimming or making long lengths manageable. The 18V would be even better.
Make sure the rotation is right and the blade was put on correctly, and if that is not the problem, it should still be under warranty if it is new. Ryobi is OK for the once a year homeowner, but not up to par beyond that.
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ranted:

The circular saws aren't very good in thick wood, but the key to making them cut well is to "let go" of them; stop trying to steer the cut like you do with a corded saw. They don't have the torque to overcome the added drag on the blade. I learned this in the first 10 minutes (both batteries' worth) of cutting attempts with my 14.4v Ryobi, and once I did, it cut for a whole lot longer. It's the same touch you use with a spoke shave or a woman: light and knowing. ;)
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The cordless saws are mostly for cutting dimensional lumber, 2x4s and such, which they do an adequate job. Plywood is a little too much for cordless saws.
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Kentucky Highlander wrote:

Um, no they work just fine in plywood, I've been using mine to cut ply for a few years now. I cut all my ply on the back of my truck then carry in inside where I finish it. My little truck is my biggest workbench.
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I have a couple Ryobi power tools that work well. No problems at all. Never tried any of their power tools. maybe you just got a lemon.

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Ryobi is not the top of the line hardware. Also, the corded saws have superior power. However I have had good service from the 18V Ryobi saw for three years. Clearly there is something wrong with the experience you cite. Given your tendency to go into a tantrum I would suggest that you avoid all power tools.
Dick

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I can relate to where you are coming from. I had about the same luck with my Ryobi circular saw also. The recip cordless saw isn't much better. Got smart and got rid of all the Ryobi's I had and bought a set of Milwaukee 18v tools and wish I had done it initially. I can't believe the performance from the Milwaukee tools. Too bad though they just got bought out by the same company that owns Royobi. I think I am going to shop for some more big red tools before they go the same way as Ryobi.
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The two Ryobi tools I own: the BE321 Belt Sander and the OSS500 Oscillating Spinder sander are fine.
By the way - I took a chance on a lil' 14.4V Cordless Skil saw from the Mart. Thing's amazing! I can rip up 3/4" ply and 4/4" oak for a *long* time on a single charge.
Best $20 "Lotto ticket" I ever bought.
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