Rusty blades...

Hey guys, I recently inherited quite a number of woodworking tools. Unfortuneately, I forgot that I had a number of new blades (circular, table-saw, etc.) that were left in a leaky truck box. When I came across them the other day, they were soaked in their retail packaging. They appear to have mostly surface rust. I sprayed some of them with WD-40 to see if the rust would come off easily. It didn't really help. In your opinion, are the blades still good? If so, can you suggest a way to clean them up? I appreciate any info that you can provide. Thanks.
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Turn on your 5 hp air compressor. Insert blades in you bead blasting cabinet and clean away. Carbide might get duller than it already is. Or send to the saw sharpening shop who will clean them up before they sharpen the carbide.
snipped-for-privacy@tampabay.rr.com (Chillee B) wrote:

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The Oct. issue of American Woodworker gives details on removing rust by electrolysis using an automotive battery charger. I have heard of this method for years but have never tried it. It sure wouldn't take much of an investment. RM ~
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wrote:

works great too....
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vaguely proposed a theory ......and in reply I say!:
remove ns from my header address to reply via email

Or http://myweb.tiscali.co.uk/andyspatch/rust.htm http://www.rowand.net/Shop/Tech/Electrolysis.htm
***************************************************** Have you noticed that people always run from what they _need_ toward what they want?????
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Locate a good sharpening service. I bet he'll take care of the rust for no charge when he sharpens them, so they aren't just pretty, but functional too. If you find the right shop, prepare yourself not to laugh when he hands you the bill. PS - Remember to tip!
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Steel wire brush wheel on a drill or grinder.

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On 18 Oct 2004 19:05:15 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@tampabay.rr.com (Chillee B) wrote:

Oven cleaner and scotch-brite. Wear some gloves and a face mask.

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HUH? Oven cleaner for rust?
Not that surface rust is pretty, but it won't make a bit of difference to a blade which cuts with carbide teeth as long as it's slicked up a bit. Wax and a rough cloth.
(Chillee B)

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On 18 Oct 2004 19:05:15 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@tampabay.rr.com (Chillee B) wrote:

Some years ago, I inherited some very rusty TS blades from my Dad, I just put them in the saw and sawed several feet of scrap wood. That actually cleaned them up pretty well, and the rust had made difference to their cutting ability. It did leave rusty stains on the first couple of feet of wood.
Barry Lennox
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