rust removal


I just found an old Stanly plane that I have had for a long time and it has some rust on it. What is the best way to remove the rust? I would like to use the plane again
--
b



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Try Electrolysis. See this link: http://www.stovebolt.com/techtips/rust/electrolytic_derusting.htm
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A lot of times electrolysis is way overkill for just light rusting. Plus its messy.
I use the rubber hand blocks from Woodcraft http://www.woodcraft.com/family.aspx?familyids29
on light rust. They are clean, work fast, and leave me with a nice finish. And I don't have to rub too hard. They abrade away, so they will follow complex surfaces.
Usual disclaimer, don't own or work for Woodcraft.
Walt C

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As usual, Woodcraft gives you a good cornholing on price - $5.50. They are $3.95 at McFeeleys. Is it just me, or is Woodcraft getting worse and worse on the gouging?

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Just be sure the blade's out etc.. :-)
It's pretty tough metal, and depends on the amount of rust. Is it pitted, or just surface? I've cleaned up planes really nicely using emery cloth and elbow grease. If really rusty, but not too pitted I start with a coarser grain, even an old flat sharpening stone that will wear a lot faster than the metal. I've had some good results, and even did one about 14" long [?] ...not sure, a long time back. It had grooves along the bottom. I even repainted it, then gave it to a person who is a fine old-time cabinet maker who had a better use for it than I did. He still uses it.
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it is surface rust. Someone told me the acid they use to clean brick will clean it. (can't think of the acid?)
wrote:

Just be sure the blade's out etc.. :-)
It's pretty tough metal, and depends on the amount of rust. Is it pitted, or just surface? I've cleaned up planes really nicely using emery cloth and elbow grease. If really rusty, but not too pitted I start with a coarser grain, even an old flat sharpening stone that will wear a lot faster than the metal. I've had some good results, and even did one about 14" long [?] ...not sure, a long time back. It had grooves along the bottom. I even repainted it, then gave it to a person who is a fine old-time cabinet maker who had a better use for it than I did. He still uses it.
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Why not start by working it over with some kerosene and a shop rag, and see how it looks when you get done? Then let it dry, and paste wax everything, sharpen & hone the blade, adjust it, and put it to work.
Save the major chemicals for later, if you aren't happy with the results.
Patriarch
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--
Nahmie
Those on the cutting edge bleed a lot.
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I knew the name. I think it's a very bad idea, however.
Patriarch, who has scrubbed a few bricks and blocks in his youth.
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muriatic acid will clean the rust so the metal looks like new
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I knew the name. I think it's a very bad idea, however.
Patriarch, who has scrubbed a few bricks and blocks in his youth.
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Maybe. Acid dissolves metal, so if the acid were used improperly it could pit a metal surface. My preference is to use kerosene, sandpaper, and elbow grease.

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wrote:

Or you could (sand)blast it with walnut shell powder, or with baking soda. But kerosene and a little 400 grit will do everything needed, as Phisherman says, and has the virtue of being cheap to implement, hard to screw up and relatively safe to the operator.
Just don't use acetone! (g,d&r!)
Patriarch
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On Thu, 24 Mar 2005 20:46:30 -0500, the inscrutable "Norman D. Crow"

$3.69 for a gallon of the 31.45% stuff at the Farmer's Building Supply here. It's also great for toilet rust stains and lime buildup. (My second toilet limes up from disuse.)
It's strong, so be sure to neutralize afterward. Muriatic is dilute hycrochloric acid. Use it outside. The fumes are nasty.
Clean, rinse/neutralize, dry off -immediately-, wax -immediately- after that. Please DAMHIKT.
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Larry Jaques writes:

OK if I just leave the bathroom window open? I'm not up for hauling the crapper outside just to get some rust off.
But I wonder what the stuff, even neutralized, will do to my septic tank.
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Take care, the fumes will make any iron that they hit rust, even if it is stainless steel. I would not recomend it for rust removal!

Nothing, even un-neutralized. Consider the acidity of rain water, or that if you are sick you also bring up fairly strong hydrochloric acid. Neutralized it's nothibg else than salt water.
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On 25 Mar 2005 08:11:46 -0800, the inscrutable "Charlie Self"

Yeah, and use a box fan + wear a respirator/gloves/goggles.
A friend who was a janitor showed me how to use it. Turn the crapper water valve OFF, use a round brush to remove the water by plunging it down the trap, carefully (without dripping it on the carpet or linoleum) put half a cup of muriatic into the bowl. Swish up under the rim and around the entire bowl, wait 5 to 10 minutes, add a cup of baking soda, turn water on, swish, and flush twice. It cleans up bowls as bad as -bar- toilets in minutes flat. Great stuff. ;)

Neutralized, it's inert and will just flow through it.
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If you can't get it acceptably clean with 30 seconds work and a plastic mesh abrasive, then use electrolysis.
Don't use acid (any of them). Acid won't do anything to de-rust it.
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Remover or the equivalent. Some metal polishes that make no mention of rust removal also work.
If it's a little heavier salted vinegar makes a weak acid that works, but oil or wax it as soon as it comes out of the solution or it'll start rerusting almost immediately.
And if all else fails, there's always electrolysis.
--
Homo sapiens is a goal, not a description

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