Running Steel through Thickness Sander

I would be interested to hear the pros and cons of running flat steel bars through my Performax Thickness Sander.
This all started when I decided to purchase carbide jointer blades for my old, 6" Delta jointer and measured up my current blades to find they were 3/32" thick. The replacement blades are 1/8" thick so before ordering I wanted to make sure they would fit my jointer.
To check on this I made a 6" x 5/8" x 1/8" thick maple strip and tried replacing one of the blades. The backing bars were a bit gummy with some superficial rust so I cleaned them and found the maple strip did not quite fit in with the tightening bolts backed up as far as they would go but it was very close. I then ran it through my thickness sander using a n old 240 grit sandpaper roll. I obviously applied the absolute minimum pressure so it could barely be heard and it cleaned and polished the bar beautifully. In total maybe a little over a quarter of a turn on the adjustment and about 6 or 7 passes, the maple strips now slides easily into the jointer head.
I am not recommending this or planning to do anything similar in the future but it worked for me.
Has anyone else tried something similar?
With thanks,
Glen Duff
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I remember seeing where Timesaver reversed the direction of the abrasive belts on their wide belts for sanding metals, i.e., the typical wood sander abrades towards the infeed side/throwing dust up onto the unsanded part of the board whereas the metal sanders throw onto the freshly abraded surface, i.e., and forevermore, bass akwards to what we are used to. I suspect they (the metal sanders) have to have one hellava holding system to keep the metal from shooting through the sander.
There also may be an issue with feet-per-minute speeds of wood sanders especially if you are wanting to sand something that you want to hold and edge later on, i.e., don't want to screw up tool steel with heat generated.
Just a thought.
UA100
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[...]
SO did you try already? BTW: "carbide" is not steel, but at least with carbide you have no problem with heat softening. Maybe you need a different sanding belt, and also you have to theink on how you mount the new blades so you don#t change tha cutting angles.
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I'm pretty sure he was talking about sanding the hold-down bars so that the slightly thicker carbide knives would fit...
BTW, my grizzly widebelt's drums spin so that they pull away from the infeed... if you take too heavy a cut, sometimes stuff does infact shoot toward outfeed at amazingly high velocity
On Sat, 14 Feb 2004 16:22:42 +0100, Juergen Hannappel wrote:

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Are you sure the 1/8" blades won't work? I too had an old Delta jointer and bought 1/8" replacement blades. They barely fit, but they did go in. And as I was told by my supplier and found out by myself. Even if the new blades are thicker than was called far, as long as they fit and can be tightened down, they will work fine.
Preston

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Considering how little I sanded down on the hold down bars I'm not surprised you could fit in a 1/8" blade. The 1/8" thick sample hardwood I made did not quite fit in but it may have been as much the gum and superficial rust. However, a little sanding will make them easier to fit in and the ends of the holding screws will still be well away from the blades.
Anyway, it seemed to work well for me.
Glen Duff ---------------------------
Preston Andreas wrote:

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I suggest you clean up all the sawdust in the shop and keep a fire extinguisher handy. You may get lots of sparks.
I once lit my pants on fire using a bench grinder.
--

FF

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On 16 Feb 2004 08:48:33 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@spamcop.net (Fred the Red Shirt) wrote:

Many have done the same thing rough grinding a chisel bevel on a belt sander. <G>
Barry
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By 16 Feb 2004 08:48:33 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@spamcop.net (Fred the Red Shirt) decided to post "Re: Running Steel through Thickness Sander" to rec.woodworking:

Sorry, but it had to be said:
"LIAR LIAR."
/ts
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