Running a 240 volt line

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I'm in the process of having a home built (my first) and am thinking about having a 240 volt line wired in. To do this I have to pay $200 for a change order fee (added BS) plus the cost of wiring it in I suppose. I was wondering if it is possible to have it wired in later on, and approximately what it would cost to do so. I appears the power wires are underground, since I don't see any poles in the area. The contractor said something to the effect that if it were done later it wouldn't be covered, or would void the house warranty (electrical part, I assume). So my question is, does paying the $200 sound reasonable, or wait and pay later. At the moment, the only tool I have that can be switched to 240 v is my bandsaw, but I'm planning ahead in case I get that cabinet saw. Also, my shop will initially be in the garage, but I plan to build a shop in the back yard someday and will have to have power run to the building anyway.
Thanks, Tom
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If you are really thinking about this, price adding several extra outlets. You might find there is a significant economy of scale. You will only pay the $200 once and the outlets will be priced based on labor and materials(plus profit.) The $200 is to cover the paperwork, including filing a modified electrical permit. These are usually priced, based on the number of switches and outlets. Builders usually don't like to get caught cheating the building permit folks out of fees. It makes the inspectors cranky. ;-)
If you call an electrician later you will have a trip charge and the materials, labor and profit is likely to be higher. It may also affect the warranty on the house.
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All houses have 240v, so certainly it can be done later. Where is the breaker box with respect to the garage? That will determine what it will cost to run a circuit there.
What you do now will have no effect on what it costs to run a circuit to the new workshop later on, so if you won't need 240 until then, it would be a waste to do anything now.
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It's certainly less expensive to have the electrician run that circuit now at the same time that he's installing everything else (i.e. during electrical rough-in, *before* the drywall goes up), than it will be to have him do it later *after* the drywall is up.
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek-at-milmac-dot-com)
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Toller wrote:
<snip>

Mine didn't.
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA (Remove "SPAM" from email address to reply)
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On Sun, 04 Apr 2004 15:55:47 -0400, Nova wrote:

Didn't have 240v to your breaker/fuse box, or didn't have a 240v circuit wired? Big difference.
--
Joe Wells


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Joe Wells wrote:

I didn't have 240V from the pole to the house. It's not uncommon in old homes.
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA (Remove "SPAM" from email address to reply)
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The house I grew up in (suburban NJ) was build in the 1950's. It only had 110V service.
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However, his is new construction.
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brought forth from the murky depths:

Are you still running Edison DC there, Yack? Whatta hoot!
--
The State always moves slowly and grudgingly towards any purpose that
accrues to society's advantage, but moves rapidly and with alacrity
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Larry Jaques wrote:

The Niagara Falls hydroelectric plant has been AC since it started in 1896. It was 25 Hz, but AC.
By the way, the last time I lost commercial power at my house was due to an ice storm. It was in 1977.
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA (Remove "SPAM" from email address to reply)
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brought forth from the murky depths:

Ayup. I read a book on Edison last year and cringed (again) when I reread how he stuck to DC and got skunked by Westinghouse.

Amazing. I've lost it here in "modern" Grants Pass several times for several hours since moving here 2 years ago. I already had a kero lamp and bought a propane single-burner stove for the times I had to warm my coffee by gas. Batteries fueled the radio and I had a rockin' good time.
------------------------------------------------------------- * * Humorous T-shirts Online * Norm's Got Strings * Wondrous Website Design * * http://www.diversify.com -------------------------------------------------------------
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Your clothes dryer runs on 240v, so your home had better come wired for it.

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I "stole" the 240v line to the kitchen stove (there's a gas stove) and put into my shop. I could have taken the 240v from the laundry just as easily, but decided to leave it because so many folks like an electric dryer more than having an electric stove.
wrote:

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Gas Dryer?
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Are you saying that the house is only being supplied with a single 110V rail and neutral. Ask the contractor how you are to run cookers, stove tops, water heaters and washing machines, they all run off 220V. Not being a native of the US I don't know all your regs, but all the houses I've seen are supplied with 2 110V rails, anti phase and neutral, its not a true 3 phase supply otherwise you would get 155V p/p.
Or are you saying that it would cost an additional $200 to run it to where you specify?
When you eventually complete your shop, some of the medium size DCs are also dual voltage and pull a hell of a starting current due to the size and mass of the impeller, also depending where you live you might want a shop AC as well...
Just food for thought.
Bernard R
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http://pages.cthome.net/edhome
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155v?! How do you figure that? Is 208v just an expression? Where the hell are you from that the houses get 110v, and why don't you go back there? In the US houses have to get 120v.

Geez, if you bothered to read the OP you would know that is strictly for the change order; the work is extra.

Well, it is food that has been digested.
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Thank you for the correction on the 208V, a mental aberation on my part.
As far as the 110V is concerned the following is an extract from the Electrical Wiring FAQ Part 1. "One thing where things might get a bit confusing is the different numbers people bandy about for the voltage of a circuit. One person might talk about 110V, another 117V or another 120V. These are all, in fact, exactly the same thing... In North America the utility companies are required to supply a split-phase 240 volt (+-5%) feed to your house. This works out as two 120V +- 5% legs. ...... This FAQ has chosen to be consistent with calling them "110V" and "220V", except when actually saying what the measured voltage will be."
I merely go along with your own convertions.
Bernard R
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that is more than 5% out of spec), yet choses to use an incorrect term.
You, knowing the FAQ is wrong, choose to follow it's error.
So how does it become MY convertion? And, just what is a convertion?
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