Runners for Cross Cut Sled - Hardwood or Aluminum?

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Aluminum might react with the steel of the table top over time if left unused for a while in a humid environment. Anodizing the aluminum would virtually eliminate that. Anodizing has the advantage of creating a hard wear resistant surface on the aluminum parts. So, the correct answer is adult diapers. (It Depends.)
To those who might argue about anodized aluminum, there are modestly decent life desktop size CNC mills that have anodized aluminum wear surfaces. Strictly hobby stuff, but still.
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On 2/3/2015 10:05 AM, Bob La Londe wrote:

You can get electrolysis between aluminum and iron with the presence of water, a good reason to insure that the coolant in your car engine bis kept fresh, but Kreg miter gauges are 95% aluminum and I had one sitting on top of my cast iron TS for years on end with out any problems. The bar was silver so I am not sure if it was anodized, the blue upper part of the gauge was certainly anodized. I did how ever encounter problems with the Kreg miter gauge. Primarily the aluminum guide bar should have not been made from aluminum, it flexed very easily and on wide panel cuts the fence was less that steady because of the guide flex. Secondly the brass indexing pin finally seized in the aluminum one morning and I was unable to remove it after it had set in the sunlight for a few hours. I then switched to an Incra miter gauge with steel guide bar and anodize aluminum fence. FWIW the longer the guide bar the better the accuracy especially when the fence is 12" shy of touching the front of the saw table when cutting wide panels.

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On Mon, 2 Feb 2015 12:38:37 -0800 (PST)

what happens to that sled when you start cutting angles it's not going to be great
do tablesaws come with sleds now or is it all diy and aftermarket? are they intended for just 90s? what problem do they solve?
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On 2/4/2015 5:22 PM, Electric Comet wrote:

If you look in the right places table saws come with sliding tables. SawStop offers one now.
I considered buying this one, but chose the SawStop.
http://www.lagunatools.com/tablesaws/tablesaw-tssws#
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On 2/4/15 5:22 PM, Electric Comet wrote:

Which angles? Miter or bevel? I've cut both using mine and they are extremely accurate and repeatable. I put a miter gauge on mine with an adjustable stop for repeated cuts.
http://youtu.be/DPg5xdeyCQk

http://youtu.be/DPg5xdeyCQk


I guess if there's a problem it's wanting to cut wider boards or longer panels with extreme accuracy and safety. Most miter gauges are not very wide and while you can add a longer fence to them, they are not good for panels because their runners are so short.
They are quick and cheap to make, too, so it's really a no-brainer decision. Once you have one and see how accurate and versatile they are, you wonder why you didn't build it sooner.
I have a sacrificial bottom on mine that repositions to close the gap created by the saw kerf of different blades. This creates a zero-clearance insert affect that eliminates tear-out yielding a very clean cut.
--

-MIKE-

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On Wed, 04 Feb 2015 20:11:40 -0600

Either, don't the cuts fill up with dust and don't they weaken the sled?
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On 2/5/2015 11:03 AM, Electric Comet wrote:

Square or angle cuts are still using the same path, you simply place the work in the sled at an angle. Some sleds have fences that work similar to one found on a miter gauge. These sleds typically do not work on both sides of the blade.
This is an excellent sled. I have had both the left and right side sleds for 15 years.
http://in-lineindustries.com/products/the-original-dubby/
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On 2/5/15 11:03 AM, Electric Comet wrote:

(I saw your reply to the other post.) Also keep in mind that there is a front and back solid piece of wood bridging the two sides of the sled. The saw blade doesn't cut through these solid pieces, no matter the angle or height of the blade. Something to keep in mind when making yours-- design and build it so those pieces are quite a bit higher than the blade at it's highest setting.
That's for a double sides sled. There are single sides designs out there, which have much shorter fences because they aren't bridging the saw blade.
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On Thu, 05 Feb 2015 11:50:06 -0600

I did notice that because I made a fence on my miter that was not but sometimes i like learning the hard way but not always
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On Wed, 04 Feb 2015 20:11:40 -0600

This answers my other post. I might try one when I find time
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On Monday, February 2, 2015 at 3:38:43 PM UTC-5, DerbyDad03 wrote:

I decided to go with maple. I cut the runners tonight, the rest of the sled will have to wait until tomorrow.
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I would use two hardwood runners instead of a single runner of either. Why, because the two runners gives greater accuracy and the hardwood runners are much easier to replace and have a similar life service time as the aluminum ones.
That being said, it all depends on the "hardwood" chosen. For me it would be either jatoba or jarrah, though ipe is certainly a good choice.
Deb
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