Runners for Cross Cut Sled - Hardwood or Aluminum?

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wrote:

Than anodized aluminum? Aluminum is certainly harder than Boeshield.

It does. My aluminum miter gauge certainly scratches the top.
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On 2/3/15 6:01 PM, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

So is wood. So is plastic. So is my fingernail.

I think you need to be a little more gentle. :-p
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wrote:

I doubt you'll scrape off the Boeshield with your fingernail but I try not to drag my fingernails across the top, too. Nah, wood and plastic might push it around some but it's not going to plow through it.

I guess I could put UHMW strips on the bottom but really, the miter gauges do scratch the surface, in multiple places.
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On 2/3/2015 8:49 PM, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

If yu are using Boeshield to protect your TS top you don't have near the rust problem you might think you have. Boeshield absolutely would did not offer enough protection for me when I first used it 15 years ago. TopKote and its successor is the only thing that works for me.
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wrote:

Rust *is* a problem. I used to have the saw in the garage when I lived in Alabama. I now have a basement but it's still very humid. I keep one of the magnetic covers on the saw, and a beach towel on top of that.
I've been thinking of trying TopKote (or whatever it's called these days) and even bought a can but it doesn't say anything about preventing rust. Did they change the formula? I really don't like Boeshield but I like rust a lot less.
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On 2/4/2015 6:34 PM, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

Way back when, when Topcote was originally made by Empire, I bought it to only slick up my TS Top, that is what it was made for. It was great for that but after about 6 months I noticed that I was no longer having an issue with rust. You need to put on a lot the first time, a few coats and the more you use it the better it protects. It is not guaranteed to prevent rust but as a bonus it works better for me than any thing else I have tried.
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On 2/4/2015 7:04 PM, Leon wrote:

This place is the leas expensive that I have found for TopCote/GlideCote.
http://www.cabinethardware.com/SearchResults.asp?Search=topcote
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wrote:

Wow! Free shipping, too. I've seen prices like that but they don't tell you that they charge $15-$20 shipping and handling.
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On 2/4/2015 9:03 PM, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

Fortunately they are a local place for me that I have been doing business with for 20+ years. I would suspect their web site not determining a correct shipping price.... Seems if there were free shipping there would not be an input location for destination. This store is top notch with very helpful people and they typically beat the pants off of the competition prices.
Either way the average price, elsewhere, for a can is around $18-19.
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On Wednesday, February 4, 2015 at 11:42:21 PM UTC-5, Leon wrote:

it

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I can second Leon's opinion of cabinethardware.com's customer service.
Based on Leon's recommendation, I purchased some drawer slides from them. T he website listed the slides as Full Extension, Soft Close. I ordered four 22" slides and one 12" slide. I found that the 12" slide was not full exten sion. When I called, the CSR did some research and found that the 12" in th at line was indeed *not* Full Extension, nor were 14" of the same model. Ho wever, the same manufacturer had another (more expensive) line of slides an d the 14" in that line was Full Extension. He offered to send me a 14" Full Extension slide, no charge of course, which I accepted.
I checked the website a few hours later and it had already been updated to show that the particular 12" and 14" slides in the line that I originally b ought were 3/4 Extension.
It will take a few adjustments to fit the 14" slide in where I was going to put the 12", but it will fit. Overall, I was extremely satisfied with my d ealings with cabinethardware.com's customer service department.
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On 2/5/2015 7:13 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Most all of the people that you deal directly with have been there for years and it is an old family owned business. I really like dealing with Barbara.
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wrote:

Perhaps, but the location is also used to calculate tax. I went through the order up to where I had to pull the trigger, just to see what their shipping charges were. Of course there could be a mistake but it showed no shipping charges.

Sure, but shipping can *easily* eat that up. Amazon has some great prices, too, but the shipping charges can absolutely kill ya'. ;-)
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wrote:

You have some remarkable aluminum (or wierd iron), aluminum is much softer than iron. Here's a Moh's scale...
http://www.jewelrynotes.com/the-mohs-scale-of-hardness-for-metals-why-it-is-important/
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On 2/4/2015 6:07 AM, dadiOH wrote:

I will say that with enough repeated passes most anything will cause a wear pattern on cast iron. I have those all over the place running parallel to the blade and perpendicular to the blade. Parallel marks from the miter gauges/sleds/wood. Perpendicular marks from the fence support pad that slides across the back of the TS top, that is the low friction plastic stuff. Anyway the wear marks are only visible you certainly can't feel them nor are they more susceptible to rust.
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On Wednesday, February 4, 2015 at 4:07:33 AM UTC-8, dadiOH wrote:

Anodized aluminum (aluminum oxide in a transparent form on the metal surface) is also called corundum. Mohs scale, corundum is #9, and is quite a bit harder than steel (4.5 or so).
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On 2/4/2015 4:55 PM, whit3rd wrote:

And whether it matters or not, most of the equipment we are talking about, that might be scratched, is cast iron, not steel. And cast iron TS top are pretty soft.
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On 2/2/2015 6:46 PM, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

Most the places I get rust are not in scratches, and who cares if it does. Rust will come off very easily with simple use. If you have a surface that is rusting you need to use the machine more. ;~)
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wrote:

Rust goes a lot deeper than what you're going to take off with a little wood.

Well... I haven't used it in at least three months and it'll be another three months until I can again. :-(
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On Monday, February 2, 2015 at 12:38:43 PM UTC-8, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Hardwood, waxed, works fine. My saw lives in a shed, and dissimilar metals in contact can be troublesome (so the aluminum idea bothers me). Rather than glue, or predrill and screw, I used POP rivets (so that's SOME aluminum content). A POP rivet head needs very little countersink depth, and the sled was 1/4" plywood.
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On 2/2/2015 2:38 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

For a woodworker a double bar is probably over kill. My best luck has always been with steel bars. Second to that is the steel bar setting in a dado to keep it straight in the bottom of the sled.
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