Rub out shellac with oil soap?

Can you rub out shellac using Murpheys oil soap as a lubricant?
Seems like I read that somewhere, but am not sure about the water base on shellac...
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I've rubbed out shellac WITH water. Cuts faster than oil, so be careful not to go through it too fast. Best I can tell, same finish in the end. I don't know about Murpheys, however. The classic oil to use is Paraffin oil. You can find that at good woodworking stores.
-m
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wrote:

I was under the impression that Paraffin oil was also known as undyed K1 kerosene here in the US.
Barry
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It is.

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Try using paste wax. Works great.
Good luck Rob
--


http://www.robswoodworking.com

"brian roth" <brian_j snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com> wrote in message
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On 8 Nov 2004 18:21:19 -0800, brian_j snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (brian roth) wrote:

Henry IV
Glendower: "I can call spirits from the vasty deep."
Hotspur: "Why so can I, or so can any man; but will they come when you do call them?"
IMHE, choosing the right lubricant depends on what you use as an abrasive. I've never used "Murpheys oil soap", but it sounds a bit on the heavier side. I've found that the lighter the better. I usually use water with either rottenstone or charcoal, might use liquid paraffin if I'm doing something heavier with pumice.
And of course, experiment on some scrap, or you're experimenting on your project.
--
Smert' spamionam

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Reinforce this right answer. The degree of aggressiveness desired determines the lubricant for any given abrasive. If you're using 1000 wet/dry, you'll be forever with wax - extremely heavy oil - less with decreasing viscosity. As particle size decreases, so should the viscosity to remain effective.
Personally, I'm a mineral spirits guy. I avoid water because of the horrible things that can happen if I get a breakthrough.

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I've seen tons of references talking about using some type of lubricant for rub out and I've used it myself on a couple of projects with great, if somewhat messy, success. However I've never seen a detailed description of how MUCH lubricant to use. It seemed I always had a big cleanup mess afterward.
As I said, I've used water (with a bit of mild soap) and sprayed it on with a plastic spray bottle. I've done two techniques, sprayed the work surface so there was a fine mist on it, and sprayed the sanding pad so it was wet to the touch. I think I prefer spraying the work surface but, for us novices, what would you recommend as a technique and quantity of lubricant?
Thanks in advance. TWS http://tomstudwell.com/allprojects.htm
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I dampen the rubber and stick the powder to it.
For wet/dry paper, I keep dipping it into an old margarine tub of the stuff.
Main thing is to recognize that it is a lube, and needs to be there. Only a mess says too much.
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mineral spirits and dip the ROS every once in a while?
TWS http://tomstudwell.com/allprojects.htm
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Not in my lifetime.
If you're going to use one of those slow speed buffers, you'll want a lube that holds the grit to the buff and controls the throw. Same principle as using tripoli or rouge bound with wax on a wheel.
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