Routing plywood

I need a little advice. I want to build a blanket chest using mostly plywood. I've thought about using a "joint cutting bit" in a router to create the 90 degree slots in which to join the corners; I'd like to conceal the plywood edges. Would this work? If so, what kind of bit is recommended?
Your advice is very much appreciated...
Chris
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: I need a little advice. I want to build a blanket chest using mostly : plywood. I've thought about using a "joint cutting bit" in a router : to create the 90 degree slots in which to join the corners; I'd like : to conceal the plywood edges. Would this work? If so, what kind of : bit is recommended? : : Your advice is very much appreciated... : : Chris
I used a lock miter on plywood with no problem. Did not get any blow out. Make nice 90's. You need a variable speed router and a table with a high fence. Feather boards help to keep the stock against the fence.
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On 17 Oct 2003 05:03:55 -0700, msstate snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Chris Nail) wrote:

It would probably work, but I might question the overall strength of the chest. A better plan is to use grooved rails and stiles with ply panels.
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I've been tempted by this idea myself. If you try it, post the results.
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msstate snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Chris Nail) wrote in message

I actually built several drawers for custom-built cabinets in my woodshop. The drawers varied in size from just 4 inches high X 14 inches deep to 19 inches high X 25 inches deep. All drawer fronts and backs were joined to their sides via half-blind dovetails and all were made of 3/7 inch Lauan plywood. I used the PC 24-inch jig (part of the reason for this project was to teach myself how to use the jig). That was about 4 years ago and all of the cabinets have been holding-out quite well since; many have been storing heavy hand tools, blades, etc.
Now, understand that, visually, without the, sometimes, liberal and imaginative, use of wood putty, they wouldn't be a pretty sight. There was a fair amount of tear-out but mostly on the top veneer. For "indoor" furniture projects, I'd recommend using "real" wood for an attractive, and durable, outcome.
Guy
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