Routing for Beginners

Hello
I've recently started using a Router, only on test pieces of wood in order to gain some insight as to what its all about.
The bloody thing bounces all over the place, moves up and down when i think its locked and causes all other sorts of problems... not like it is on the Tv eh?
Anybody got any good tips or tricks that i could use to help me in my education or any web sites where i may be able to obtain lots of advice.
Thanks in advance
Nick
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Routers can be dangerous with a bit that is turning at 22,000 rpm for both the new and experienced user and the tips and ideas could easily fill a book. In fact, I suggest you first read a good book on routers, such as "The New Router Handbook", by Patrick Spielman, or "The Router Book", by Pat Warner. Also, check out www.patwarner.com . It has a lot of good information.
Good luck, Preston

order
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Find a class, a group, a club, a teacher, someone in person. There might be several causes for these problems that aren't obvious until someone looks while it's happening. Routers are too dangerous to go it alone if you have any choice at all. They can spin a sharp bit right through parts of you so fat, you won't notice until you feel the blood trickling.

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Yep, you can sew up a cut. Hard to sew up a dado or rabbet.

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Nick,
When you say it "bounces all around", it sounds like you are routing in the wrong direction. Read your owners manual and look for a section on routing direction or climb cutting. Most have the instructions and graphics that can explain it better than I could here.
Basically, if your router is bouncing all around, move it in the opposite direction you had been going. That should solve the problem.
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On the chance that you're serious and not a Troll:
A router is an extremely dangerous tool, even to those who take the effort to learn about them first. Put the router back on the shelf and leave it there until you read up on safe use of routers ... any good book store will have any number of books on routers and their safe use.
Also, there is a more or less a safe direction to move in when routing: Make a horizontal fist with your right hand, extend your index finger and thumb, making a backwards "L" shape as you look down at your hand.
You thumb should always point to the workpiece edge, and your index finger will point in the proper direction to push the router.
Always follow this rule until you get a handle on safe use of your router. There are times when you may purposely change this direction, called a "climb cut". A climb cut is used in situations where tearout is a problem, or because of grain direction. A climb cut should only be used if you understand and take into account the forces involved.
Consider buying/building a router table, it will allow you to use the router more safely in many instances. Make a guard for the bit and learn about using pins to start cuts.
It's a PITA to ruin a workpiece because you don't understand router basics ... the pain of losing a digit or maiming a limb will last a lot longer.
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Last update: 8/16/03
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---------- Using a router is also new to me and thus far it hasn't attacked me. I've only used a round-over cutter but I've used it on about 60 foot or so of soft pine.
So is there a logical pattern to 'router attack'? Does it depend on the density of the wood, the type of cutter or any other identifiable factor? Or is it just down to operator focus?
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It has more to do with the density of your head. Pay attention to what you are doing. Consider direction of feed (IMPORTANT!) and routing is smooth and easy.
.

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Like a good dog.

Like any cat.

Peter, what tools are on your list for use under the influence of alchohol or drugs?
Wayne- A cat lover
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I think if you use the tools in the shop under the influence of drugs and alcohol then the resultant project only looks good under the influence of drugs and alcohol...
I remember doing a remodel with a younger fellow that I was teaching how to build stud walls. In the same building there was an other guy patching walls with Bondo(r) of all things with the doors and windows closed up tight. When we finished the wall, it was the only straight looking wall in the building. When we came back the next day, I could see that somehow we flipped the cap plate end for end and every stud was off by about 2-1/2 inches. Our "straight" wall looked like a bunch of Z's ... Moral of the story, keep your head clear and your wits about you... Though I am sure with some help I could come up with a better moral involving tried and true and level and square... and all those other carpentry terms that made it into the common vernacular...
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