Routing cutting board

I am a newbie wood worker and am making some cutting boards for presents. I was thinking of making a drip edge on the board so juices flow into it. I always heard you cant "turn a corner" with a router or risk tearout. What w ould be the best way to do this and with what kind of bit?
I would also like to personalize it. How hard would it be to put their init ials on it and what would I need for that?
I appreciate your time!
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On 12/2/2014 8:02 AM, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Not sure about the drip edge being a problem unless you are going across grain on the "end" of the board. If you are using a guide and simply routing a shallow trough around the perimeter and the surface and not at the actual edge there should be no problem.
If routing the perimeter edge and across grain you will get some degree of tear out as you complete each cross grain pass.
This can be reduced if you
a. carefully start at the corner that will tear out and go backwards in direction, climb cutting. Just go an inch or soon those particular corners and complete your routing in the correct direction.
b. Make very shallow cuts and go a little deeper on each pass.
c. Route cross grain FIRST and then with the grain. The cross grain tear out will be cleaned up by the along grain pass.
PRACTICE PRACTICE PRACTICE on scraps.
Personalized lettering, "shallow" freehand or use a set of templates and guide bushings.
PRACTICE PRACTICE PRACTICE on scraps.
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On Tuesday, December 2, 2014 8:02:58 AM UTC-6, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

I was thinking of making a drip edge on the board so juices flow into it. I always heard you cant "turn a corner" with a router or risk tearout. What would be the best way to do this and with what kind of bit?

itials on it and what would I need for that?

Do have to have a plunge router to do the drip catch?
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Not if we are thinking of the same thing. Maybe a "ramp" would work (router rides the ramp up)? Or a carving gouge? Or a drill press and careful clamping? I think I'd try the ramp first. Good luck!
Bill
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Bill wrote:

Sorry, if I added confusion. I was thinking of the "ends" of the drip catch.
Bill
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On 12/2/2014 10:52 AM, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

It would be quite helpful, but not absolutely necessary. The plunge feature will give you much more control as the router base will be setting flat on the work before you plunge.
If you have a router table you could plunge the work, indexed against the fence, and carefully lower the work down on top. You would need to use stops on your fence for beginning and end points as you will not be able to see the bit.
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On 12/02/2014 10:52 AM, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

No, folks did such with fixed-base routers long before the plunge-base was ever invented...and still do. :)
Just set the router edge down on one side at an angle so bit is above the workpiece and then set it down slowly. No deeper than you want to go for this purpose, it'll barely be noticeable when you start the cut but still hold it firmly.
Did I say "PRACTICE" yet??? :)
--


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I suspect that using a regular router should not cause excessive tear if used correctly. predrill the turn point?
I suspect you will need a Dremel (-esque) router to personalize your projects. Or were you think wood burner tool to emboss the initials?
Mike in Ohio
On 12/2/2014 9:02 AM, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

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On 12/02/2014 07:02 AM, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Like this:
https://www.dropbox.com/s/ib6gqokecfj5cqc/R0010123.JPG?dl=0
Tape your template on the board with double sided tape. Put the proper bushing on your router along with a core box bit for the size of drip edge you want. Route in a counter clockwise direction around the template. You can use the same cove bit to cut finger grips on each end of the board as in the picture.
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For those others who have responded... I've done round overs all the way around 4 sides of awards plaques on my CNC router (using climb milling) and I don't recall having much problem with tear out. When I was running the fishing club I would do about 30 awards plaques at a batch out of poplar. Then I'ld swap out cutters and do the club logo. Before that when I did them on a router table I would ruin 1 in 5. That's why I used cheap box store poplar.

It would take me longer to generate the code and carry the thumb drive back to the little Chinese CNC noodle router, than it would take to cut it.
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