Routing Chair Rail Molding

Just after some advice or tips...
Have a nice one piece Freud Chair Rail Molding bit - http://freudtools.com/p-186-chair-rail-bits.aspx
Trying to figure out the best way of supporting the workpiece as I run it past the bit... it needs to be firm against the fence and held down to the table to produce an even rail molding without bumps, dips or deformities . I tried a setup today with featherboards holding the piece against the fence and down to the table but it seemed to get a lot of chattering and ended up with an uneven surface... Wasn't too bad but I am sure I can do better! This was on a farily light router table (because it had the high fence) and I think the chattering was somewhat a result of a less than solid routing surface and router table.
Planning on trying the cast iron router table next which should result in less vibration and hopefully a better result... (i was taking light cuts with same results) but just wondering if there is a better way than using featherboards, particularly with regards to holding the work against the fence... I'm thinking maybe an outer fence where the work rides between the outer fence and the router fence. Kind of sandwiched in between. First thought was that it sounded a bit dangerous wedging the work between two fences, but this is kinda what the featherboards are doing anyway??
Planning on running 3m long pieces through to make and install chair rail in mum's house. Its onlu crapiata pine but it will be painted over and only decorative, not functional rail.
Any advice or tips welcome, otherwise I'll just keep trying with featherboards alone...
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Dean wrote:

Just a thought: On my table, chattering occurs when the bit is not locked down really tight.
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Dean wrote:

1. Your featherboards should be directly above and directly opposite the bit. They need to exert a fair amount of pressure against the stock. For a bit as big as the one you are using, the feather board pushing toward the fence needs to be pretty thick...you need pressure against both the top and bottom of the stock's side. No reason two featherboards can't be stacked. With a spacer between if need be. Barring that, one featherboard slightly below the stock mid point would be best. The featherboard(s) pushing down are relatively unimportant in your case.
Even set up that way you may get some chattering. You can damp that by using another set of featherboards on the outfeed side 3-6" away from the bit. Gotta remember, a router bit isn't slicing like a knife, more like chopping with an axe; there is a lot of force pushing the stock away from the bit and fence.
A third set on the infeed side can help too but are less needed as you can use your left hand to keep the stock positioned while feeding with the right. The big advantage of infeed featherboards is that they help you feed smoothly without pauses.
2. Big bits like that always make people say, "WOW!". Personally, I try to avoid them. I try to avoid *any* bit that captures the stock...one where stock movement away from the table or fence results in a messed up profile. I'd rather use two bits to cut the same or similar profile.
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Dean wrote:

If it's possible, you'll find it much easier to run the edge of a larger piece of wood through the bit, then cut off the profiled section on the table saw.
It is very difficult to keep a thin piece of wood against a bit that tall, even with strong feather boards close to the cutter. You need more mass in the stock to keep it from flexing out at the bit.
You can run the profile on two sides of a thicker board, the rip it to thickness on the table saw. Heck, you might be able to 4 pieces of chair molding in that profile, from one 2x6.
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Taking a hint from how shapers (with big ugly bits) are setup. Not so much of a feather board but an actual board, with maybe a masonite or other slick surface. Just build a channel that is exactly the same size as the stock. One thing you can do to minimize friction is to actually have a sort of single point of contact aligned with the bit (above and to the side). so a slightly loose channel except for an inch or so exactly at the bit.
#2, this is a lot of material for 1 pass. Just setup to do some nibbles in multiple passes and get to the full depth cut in maybe 4 passes. You will be a lot happier. If you insist on hogging it out, at least do a second skim pass to clean off any chatter.
If you do the lighter cuts, then you can have a slightly looser channel.
As another posted said, if you can cut it on bigger stock then trim off the excess, the additional mass in the stock makes it easier but for this profile I think you would nedd some pretty massive hunk o' wood.

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