Routing a 3/4" Chamfer in a 1 1/2" stock

This may sound like an easy question but ... I need to cut a 3/4" chamfer in a circle cut from 1 1/2" stock. I have a 45 degree bit but it does not seem to cut a large enough chamfer -- what is the best bit for this job. Thanks in advance and sorry for such an easy question
Jerry
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(Jerry Korea) wrote:

least 3/4" in diameter. (At a 45-degree angle, the horizontal and vertical distances are the same.)
http://www.rockler.com/ecom7/product_details.cfm?sku !24&filter573
www.woodcraft.com then search for item 144122
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you want to cut a 3/4" deep chamfer at 45 degrees, you need a bit that's at

1 1/2 inch diameter and then, only if it comes to a sharp point.
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On 17 Oct 2004 16:32:54 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@adelphia.net (Jerry Korea) wrote:

That's too big for a router. You'd need an enormous bit, and a very well setup table. You could do this in a spindle moulder / shaper, because they use a bigger diameter cutter.
The problem with routing a chamfer that size is that it will be impossible to control the cutter's depth of cut to better than a small fraction of the cutter diameter. With such a big cutter, that's an appreciable wobble. You could certainly cut it (given a large enough bit), but the finished surfae would be anything but flat. If you go for it, stop early and hand plane the last pass.
My favoured approach for this would be the table saw. If I didn't have a table saw, I'd hand plane it. If you have a smaller router, then you could hog off much of the timber first.
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(Jerry Korea)

I think he's trying to do this on a curved (circular in fact) stock. So the tablesaw won't work(*). Even using a plane or spokeshave will be a little tricky with the change from long to end grain.
The ideal way to do this would be to put the stock in a bowl-turning lathe, and cut the chamfer with a skew.
I think the idea of using a long straight bit, and either tilting the router or the stock sounds most likely to work, assuming there's no lathe available.
John
(* I suspose you could pin the stock to a sled, and somehow spin it round thru the sawblade...)
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On Mon, 18 Oct 2004 16:11:06 +0000 (UTC), John McCoy

Yes, I'd missed that bit.
Then it sounds like a job for a router, mounted on a trammel. Use an extra- long straight bit (used by kitchen fitters to joint worktops - they're worth having) and make the router sled with a built-in 45 angle.
If you're hand planing something like this, I'd make a croze for it - a barrel-maker's plane, with a custom-made one-radius sole. It's soemthing to do with all the Stanley irons I have spare from upgraded bench planes.
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45-deg chamfer router bit with a longer cutting edge? Simple, quick, and easy.
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wrote:

Thank you Doug. I was reading through the whole thread before beginning a reply and the very thought that kept haunting me was "is this the Rube Goldberg newsgroup?". It was worth a good chuckle to see how complex the suggestions were becoming.
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On Mon, 18 Oct 2004 19:12:32 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

Because he's already thought of that.
Secondly, 3/4" is a big chamfer. Biggest cutter I can find is only 18mm
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MLCS and others have 'em, but won't make as smooth a cut as a spiral on a jig, especially uphill. A bit tougher on the router, swinging a 2 1/2" wing bit, too.
(Doug Miller)

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Well, no, he hadn't, or at least if he had it wasn't evident in his post.

You haven't looked very hard, then.
I already posted links yesterday, to 45-degree chamfer bits with 1 1/4" cutting lengths, one at Rockler and one at Woodcraft. Didn't take me more than two or three minutes to find them.
Google on "45 chamfer router bit" and you'll find a lot more.
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snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote in

Yeah, that would work...but calculating in my head, a 3/4" chamfer is going to result in a cut length of around 1.1". So if anyone ever needs a slightly larger chamfer (or one that's not 45 degrees, for that matter), some of the ideas in this thread could be of value :-)
John
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If you had read the whole thread, you would see that someone already posted a link to one.
" Biggest cutter I can find is only

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I did not read the entire thread either, but tonight I saw that Ridge Carbide makes a cutter that is 1 3/4". If the other link does not turn out, check with Ridge.
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Slanted jig for the router, spiral bit. Two pins to reference, in the board, router screwed to a base. That, or tilted bandsaw / disk sander with circle jig.

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On 17 Oct 2004 16:32:54 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@adelphia.net (Jerry Korea) wrote:

If you have a disk sander with a tilting table, I'd use it and a home made circle sanding jig..
I use 1/2" shank router bits in a drill press and I don't think I'd try that heavy a cut on it..
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