Routers / Lifts

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sigh...I DO ask rhetorical questions from time to time, don't I? :)
dave
Greg wrote:

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Greg G. writes:

No, I used that table for about ten years before I built the new one. It worked, it did all the things I needed it to do. It was just clumsy to use and not very accurate.
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I was just reving you up a little bit... ;-)
Greg
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I am new to this woodworking stuff (about a year) and I have read a lot of contradicting info regarding the use of a plunge router in a table. Some have posted that no problems result from their use in a table and others say DON'T DO IT.
Read what Pat Warner (router man) says about using a plunge router in a table:
"A plunge router is designed for hand held use. Its wide handled grip, motor lock, spring loaded head, up and turret stops are all components that work with gravity and in harmony with the operator's hand and eye. The tool is especially valuable for multidepth inside hand cuttings where the cutter can safely stab an excavation in the eye and handily waste it away; something a fixed base router can only do at risk. To put this tool upside down in a router table not only ignores its designers intent, its presence there compromises the integrity of the work surface, frustrates the smooth travel of the work and complicates the construction of the whole router-table. "
http://www.patwarner.com/plunge_or_fixed.html
writes:

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whether or not to put a plunge router in a table is one of those religious issue kind of things. Some folks will lambast you for it- but enough woodworkers like it that the router makers have started including table specific features in their plunge routers.
Pat Warner is a very competent woodworker who has made his specialty in the field of routers- he's very knowledgeable, very generous with his knowledge and certainly one of the best sources of information around. his religious persuasion just happens to be of the no plunge routers in the table variety. I'm not even saying he's wrong, just that my personal experience with using my plunge router in my table doesn't bear out the statements you quoted from his site.
I have 2 router tables (more or less). one has a plunge router in it, the other has a fixed base router in it. I use them for different things, although that has more to do with the size of the motors than whether they plunge or not.
    Bridger
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stoutman wrote:

That was written years ago. Since then several routers have come on the market that were _designed_ to be used under a table - including two Milwaukee models, the PC 890 series and the Triton.
Try to keep up with the times!
--
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Chris Merrill
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A plunge router designed to be used in a router table.
Sounds like an oxymoron.

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stoutman wrote:

Sorry I disagree. My router table has had both a fixed base and plunge router in it, and the plunge router is superior.
Suppose you have to route a 3/4" deep dado in 16 pieces of wood. The depth is critial, and you have to make multiple passes to do it.
You finish the job, and realize to your horror that you only did 15 of the 16 pieces. (I have been here with both a fixed base router and a plunge router mounted in the table. <g>)
-- With a fixed base router, you have to make several passes, and measure the depth of cut very carefully on the last one to make sure it's the same depth.
-- With a plunge router, what the h*ll. The max depth is already set. Drop the router down in the table to a good depth for the first cut, lock the knob, and route the piece. Raise the height a bit, lock the knob, and route again. Continue until you can't raise the router anymore because it's at max. The depth of cut is EXACTLY the same as all the other pieces you cut.
For the kind of mistakes I make <g> I can't image anything better in a router table than a plunge router -- an arbitrary number of cuts in an arbitrary number of pieces of wood to achieve the same depth of cut.
Besides that, the plunge router in a router table is easily made into a pulley / rope / foot device that can plunge into a piece of wood heald tightly against the fence. Only once have I tried to "Carefully lower the piece of wood into the spinning router blade." The wood jumped all over the place and I came close to bleeding all over the nice clean router table, and leaving one or two of my fingers on the table. Scared the snot out of me and I didn't spin the router again for over a month.
Unless someone holds a gun to my head, and can PROVE that it's loaded <g> I have no intention of EVER lowering a piece of wood onto a spinning router bit again as long as I live. It's so trivial to hold the wood against the fence, press down on a stick with my foot, and have the router bit SAFELY plunge into the wood. ;-) Hold the wood, press with the foot, move the wood, release the foot, lift the wood, TRIVIAL and SAFE!
No, IMHO, plunge routers are MADE for use in router tables. Flog me, beat me, burn me, boil me, drown me, I won't recant. <g> Hahahahahaha.....
-- Mark
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Huh,
You make some good points.
I recant! :)

depth
measure
it's
the
table.
I
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Greg wrote:

Run to your nearest Woodcraft and check out the Triton! Does everything you've mentioned...and doesn't need multiple bases to do it...
--
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Chris Merrill
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On Fri, 12 Dec 2003 02:08:41 GMT, Chris Merrill

Well, I ran to my local distributor and checked out the Triton when it first came out. Beside it was a stack of returns - and that kind of put me off. Apparently they had a problem with the electronic speed controller PCB, but I hear they corrected it, and I don't know if this is still a problem. Combined with that experience, the custom accessories, and the (then) $350 price tag...
By the same token, being from Australia, it would be a natural for mounting down-under a router table... ;-)
Now if they could just get their toilets to flush in the proper direction,...
Greg
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And just exactly which way does the water swirl when you flush???
--
This space for rent.
Jerry The Phoneman
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If you can somewhere, go check out the Milwaukee 5625-20 three and a half horsepower unit.
This is truly a great router and ideal for under a table. Electronic variable speed, which keeps the RPM's at the speed you initially set, soft start, and a really nice above-the-table height adjustment feature. Comes with both collets and 2 sub-bases...one eith the PC size hole for the PC system of bushings.
In my (now-soon-to-be-gone) job at a WWW store, I've gotten to use a bunch of routers in my demos for customers and woodworking classes I was teaching. This includes all the PC's, Triton, Makita, DeWalt, Bosch and Milwaukee's. Since the darn stores are all going out of business and I won't have the in-store shop to work in anymore, I found myself wanting to purchase a new router for my own shop,
The 3 1/2 horse Milwaukee was my head and shoulders above the rest choice.
But ANY of the other routers mentioned by the other posters will do the job. IMHO, it just comes down to which one YOU like the feel of the best.
Terry Sumner
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"IMHO, it just comes down to which one YOU like the feel of

-Not to mention how many Benjamins you walk in the door with. :) The 5625-20 is not a cheap router.

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wrote:

Yes, I considered it, but the price and weight kind of put me off. I do have a couple of Milwaukee tools, and they are all fine - unlike the B&D and Skil crap I have been given (and returned) over the years...
Just when I get totally fed up with Delta/PC quality and service and start shopping elsewhere, they will do something to make up for it. Hopefully the PC890 is such an effort, and it better be Made In U.S.A.
Greg
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