Router template problem

I'm template routing 2x2 red cedar for the rear legs of 6 patio chairs I'm building. i've rough cut on the bandsaw and attached my template to the piece. problem is the nasty tearout that I get when the grain changes. I actually have a chunk in my hand that came off the first leg. I've stopped at this point with 11 legs waiting and am looking for some suggestions to minimize this. don't want to ruin any of the other legs. thanks
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cut close on a band saw, and use a belt or spindle sander to get the rest of the way.
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Read the grain on the wood and reverse the direction that you are routing when in these areas. Cutting very close to the line with the BS helps to cut down on router bit grab when going in the reverse direction.
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I have had the same problem and both sugestions work. I find that a larger diameter pattern bit works well but you do need to cut as close to the line as possible. Some of my projects are here www.howardboehm.com just finished my bar.
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: I'm template routing 2x2 red cedar for the rear legs of 6 patio chairs I'm : building. i've rough cut on the bandsaw and attached my template to the : piece. problem is the nasty tearout that I get when the grain changes. I : actually have a chunk in my hand that came off the first leg. I've stopped : at this point with 11 legs waiting and am looking for some suggestions to : minimize this. don't want to ruin any of the other legs. thanks
Wood Whisperer has a good video on this.
http://link.brightcove.com/services/link/bcpid1344664476/bclid1344578261/bctid1390022240
It deals with this specifically at the end. Sometimes a video is worth a thousand words.
Wood Whisperer home page: http://thewoodwhisperer.com /
--- Chip
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THANK YOU, that's a good clip and good site.

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Use two bits. Requires more work (2 bit changes per leg), but you will be guaranteed almost no chip out.
Some really cool woodworker made a web page devoted to the topic. See here: http://www.garagewoodworks.com/Template_Routing.htm
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Brian
www.garagewoodworks.com
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Make that only ONE bit change per leg.
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Brian
www.garagewoodworks.com
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Well that certainly is a good idea. One possible problem though is that with the pattern on top you cannot see which way the grain is going and you might just go a little too far and get back into the problem area. That certainly should work well on relatively straight grain wood and straight cuts. Inconsistent grain and or a curved pattern may present its own set of problems when the pattern is on top. Perhaps a clear plastic pattern!
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Pencil marks on the pattern denoting when to stop?

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Work waaay too thick for a pattern bit. Should be routed with ordinary straight bit, collar guide, & a plunge router. Cuts should be about 3/16"/pass. WIll take a lot of work & time, produce a bucket of chips, make a lot of noise. Payoff: Very little tearout. ************* www.patwarner.com for more on routing. **************************************

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