Router Tables

Another silly question but, as an old boss once said to me -- "You didn't ask. And if you don't ask you don't want to know. And if you don't want to know I'm not going to waste my time telling you".
I have a router which does not have a lock-on for the power switch i.e let the switch go -- the router stops. How could this router be fixed into a commercial router table?
Malcolm Webb
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First, make sure you have an external power switch on the table. then you can use duct tale or open the unit and bypass the power switch. Otherwise get a 3-1/4 HP unit and dedicate it to the table.
I'm sure there are other options as well.
--
Al Reid

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Those trigger switches are nice for hand routing but a pain with tables. Question, does it have a pin next to the trigger that locks the trigger until you tweak it? If so, you can use it as is.

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No, my router doesn't have a lock-on pin. It has a pin which has to be pressed in to enable the power switch to be depressed, but as soon as the switch is released the motor cuts.
Malcolm Webb
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On Wed, 6 Oct 2004 18:00 +0100 (BST), snipped-for-privacy@cix.co.uk (Malcolm Webb) wrote:

provide a switch outside of the table, one you can reach easily when you're using the table. I use one of those router speed control boxes. <http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/Displayitem.taf?itemnumberC060>
if this router is going to stay in the table you can lock the switch with a loop of electrical tape. if you're going to take it in and out make the switch lock be something attached to the cord such that in order to plug the router in you have to unlock the switch.....
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snipped-for-privacy@cix.co.uk (Malcolm Webb) wrote in

As others have stated, you need an external switch box so that you can turn the router on and off easily. For keeping the trigger depressed, use one of those velcro strips sold for bundling cord. Less messy than peeling off duct tape when you use it out of the table. It's very tempting to use a cable tie, but then you have to remember where you left the side cutters.
Be sure your external switch is OFF before you plug in the router!
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Zip tie and a light switch

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Don't use a lightswitch - the surge currents on something the size of a table-mounted router will kill it.
I strongly suggest a no-volt release switch, as for any machine tool. It also avoids the main risk of accidentally plugging the router into a live outlet.
Personally I wouldn't buy a router with an intermittent switch like this. I hope the manufacturers are listening.
--
Smert' spamionam

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On Thu, 07 Oct 2004 02:12:33 +0100, Andy Dingley

maybe. I had a 2HP induction motor running on one for several years. it came to me from my grampa that way and was old then, and when I sent it to my BIL it was still there and running fine....

I've never seen a stand alone one for sale. I wish I had a source for them... know of one?

different countries have different safety rules, and some places disallow lock-on able switches for some tools....
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On Wed, 06 Oct 2004 19:17:41 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@thanks.com wrote:

Induction motor - lower surge than a brush motor.

Axminster do a few for the UK / Euro market. They sell one as an NVR switch for small machinery, or the same thing in a neater box with a socket for rather rmore markup. I just use one from an old table saw.

Which countries ? They're OK in Europe and presumably in the USA. I keep hearing this as an explanation, but can't find anything to back it up.
--
Smert' spamionam

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On Thu, 07 Oct 2004 03:47:32 +0100, Andy Dingley

yes, but....
it was 2HP running on 110V... and the OP never said how big his router was.

thanks. found them on axminster's website: http://www.axminster.co.uk/product.asp?pf_id5573&sfile=1&jump=0 http://www.axminster.co.uk/product.asp?pf_id !289&sfile=1&jump=4 http://www.axminster.co.uk/product.asp?pf_id !280&sfile=1&jump=0
I've never seen these for sale this side of the pond. I'm sure there would be a market. listening, Robin Lee?

Japan, though that was for a handheld planer, not a router. I don't have any information about routers there.
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wrote:

Noel
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As this is my first router, I wasn't aware that some are provided with a lock-on switch, but maybe I should have been because my other power tools have lock-on switches.
Malcolm Webb
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On Thu, 7 Oct 2004 07:45 +0100 (BST), snipped-for-privacy@cix.co.uk (Malcolm Webb) wrote:

Malcolm-
what make and model is your router? what kind of woodworking did you buy it for?
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