Router table top

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Getting ready to buy the laminate for the top and fence. Any reason to not buy white? Been wondering about glare. 'Course any color even close to wood is out. Thanks for ya'll's input.
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Mine is forest green, mostly because it was the only laminate with a mirror finish, instead of the more common textured finish. http://www.delorie.com/wood/projects/router /
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I went with this color mainly because it had the roughest texture they had. The texture reduced friction when sliding the wood across it.
I also thought it looked pretty cool.
http://www.arealnice.com/Joey/IMG_0017.JPG
Gary
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I have shop-envy!!! That's a great workspace! :-)
JJ
snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

I also went with a lightly textured formica. It definately cuts down the friction and makes wood move across it more smoothly.
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Rick Samuel wrote:

White will show up scratches ect.
How about Black?
--
Sir Benjamin Middlethwaite




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On Thu, 12 Oct 2006 02:10:29 GMT, "The3rd Earl Of Derby"

Black will show up scratches more than white. With that in mind, buy the stuff on price and colors that grab your fancy. Mines yellow and the scratches merely mean I use it.
Pete

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Mine's white, with sort of a mottled/marbled 70's gold pattern. I think it's the perfect color, because that's the scrap of countertop I happened to find on the curb when I was ready to build my router table. I've never had a problem with glare off the router table. For routing, I would think that light from above or behind the operator would be more appropriate than a raking light in front of the operator.
I think flatness and smoothness are a lot more important than color. That said, if I had the choice, I'd generally pick light-colored things to reflect more light and make the shop seem brighter. One other consideration - have you looked at UHMW (HDPE) sheets for the face of your fence? Easy to machine, and it will reduce friction. Don't worry, it IS available in different colors, if that's your main priority. Andy
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The3rd Earl Of Derby wrote:

It's worse. <G>
Mine is black, 'cause I had free black laminate. White (as is my tablesaw outfeed) is usually cheaper, looks fine when paste waxed for lubrication purposes, reflects the shop light, and is easy to pencil notes, stop marks, and indexes on.
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Wed, Oct 11, 2006, 8:05pm (EDT-1) snipped-for-privacy@moment.net (RickSamuel) doth burbleth: <snip> 'Course any color even close to wood is out. <snip>
To put it politely, bullshit. Every router table I've made so far has had a wood top, probably any future ones will also.
JOAT It's not hard, if you get your mind right. - Granny Weatherwax
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Solid, non-metallic colors are likely to be good choices. My metallic table saw top reflects the sun quite well directly into my eyes so I put a board on the part I'm not using. The one I usually use has a white top, and cuts down on the glare tremendously.
Puckdropper
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Wise is the man who attempts to answer his question before asking it.

To email me directly, send a message to puckdropper (at) fastmail.fm
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Rick Samuel wrote:

I followed Pat Warner's advice and made my router table top out of mdf and just soaked it in Watco. It works great and wears very well. You might consider that if you have some Watco on hand and don't want to mess with buying and gluing laminate.
Mark
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Rick Samuel wrote:

If there is one in your area, you might want to talk to a countertop place and see if they've got any scraps they'll give you. I got the laminate for my router table top for free that way.
Chris
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Hey.
I have made my router table top of MDF. What should I treat it with? Enamel paint, wax? Any suggestion?
May-Brith from Norway.
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Thu, Oct 12, 2006, 8:45am (EDT+6) snipped-for-privacy@losmail.no (May-BrithNilsen) doth queryeth: Hey. I have made my router table top of MDF. What should I treat it with? Enamel paint, wax? Any suggestion?
Personally, I'd say go with whichever pleases you - it's your router table, you made it, the only one whose opinion counts is you. It doesn't matter what anyone else thinks about the way it's fiished.
Mine is made out of some rather ice plywood. I don't have any finish on it at all. But if I were to put a finish on it, I'd probably go with paste wax. Or, if I thought it would work better painted, I'd paint it in a heartbeat - probably yellow.
JOAT It's not hard, if you get your mind right. - Granny Weatherwax
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(May-Brith Nilsen) doth queryeth: Hey. I have made my router table top of MDF. What should I treat it with? Enamel paint, wax? Any suggestion?
Personally, I'd say go with whichever pleases you - it's your router table, you made it, the only one whose opinion counts is you. It doesn't matter what anyone else thinks about the way it's fiished.
Mine is made out of some rather ice plywood. I don't have any finish on it at all. But if I were to put a finish on it, I'd probably go with paste wax. Or, if I thought it would work better painted, I'd paint it in a heartbeat - probably yellow.
JOAT It's not hard, if you get your mind right. - Granny Weatherwax
It was more a question on what is smooth and durable enough.
May-Brith from Norway
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Thu, Oct 12, 2006, 4:39pm (EDT+6) snipped-for-privacy@losmail.no (May-BrithNilsen) doth sayeth: It was more a question on what is smooth and durable enough.
Ah. OK, in that case my previous router table top was unfinished, no wax, nothing, and served well for maybe 5 years. I made the present top not so long ago, only because of changineg needs, not because of any problem with durability or smoothness. It's unfinished plywood, and will stay that way. I have had no pblems with smoothness or durability on my previous top, and anticipae none on this top..
JOAT It's not hard, if you get your mind right. - Granny Weatherwax
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On Thu, 12 Oct 2006 08:16:21 -0400, J T wrote:

Probably for about the same reason I paint my shop-built stuff purple. It's so ugly that no one is tempted to borrow it.
Bill
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When I use MDF for jigs I finish them with shellac followed by paste wax. For MDF shop cabinets I prime them with an oil-based primer followed by a coat or two of spray enamel. I have used polyurethane varnish on MDF (several coats) with good results too. Hank from NY
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May-Brith Nilsen wrote:

I followed the path of least resistance, using a sink cutout in laminate. It worked, but clamping guide boards was a pain, because the textured surface was slippery (as other posters have noted).
So, I coarse-sanded it to give it some tooth. A C-clamp (aka G-cramp) now holds a fence on just fine.
So, if I used MDF, I'd finish the top with PVA adhesive, at least around the edges. But I've also glued sandpaper onto jig surfaces...
--- yet another weekend woodwright
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