Router table recommendations

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On Wed, 07 Dec 2011 18:36:21 -0800, Ralph Compton wrote:

Well, JessEm is the best but they are spendy. As others have suggested, it's not that hard to build one. Google "router table plans"
Since you have a small shop, there are a couple of alternatives you might want to consider. One is a table that replaces one of the wings on your table saw. I had one like that for years and it worked fine. Then I went with a different saw with no wings. What I have now is a table top I got from MLCS (Icould have made one) mounted on folding brackets attached to one end of a tool stand. Either would save you space.
If you decide to buy rather than build, check out this website:
http://routertablereview.com /
--
Intelligence is an experiment that failed - G. B. Shaw

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Definitely considering building my own, not comfortable yet with some of the skills needed to put in t-track, inserts, etc.
Thanks for all the information to consider, now on out to the garage and stare at wood for a while.
Ralph

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"Ralph Compton" wrote:

SFWIW, I built the NYW station using ONLY a Bosch saber saw, PC690 hand held router, ROS hand sander, a straight edge and a couple of clamps.
A friend allowed me access to his drill press which made life easier.
Have fun.
Lew
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Thanks.
I think I will do it myself as that looks to be the only way I can afford something large enough to suit me. Cabinetry is no big thing, I've made various cabinets and have recently begun to make drawers. I am somewhat intimidated by the need for precision (flatness) in making the actual tabletop and insert. But I suspect I'll get over that. I especially like the idea that if I build it myself I can make a double-duty (or more) tool.
Ralph

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"Ralph Compton" wrote in message
Definitely considering building my own, not comfortable yet with some of the skills needed to put in t-track, inserts, etc. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- If you are not comfortable with that, build the professional version. Take a piece of plywood, drill a 1.5" hole in it. Mount your router to the board, centered on the hole. Flip the assembly over, set on saw horses, clamp to workbench or whatever is handy. Two C clamps and a strait board for a fence and you are in business.
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I think I could probably handle that. One of my friends (a tile installer) calls it a jobsite router table.

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I made a table last year. One thing I'm very glad I did was make it 46 inches high. It's a very convenient height.
You'll end up routing three slots. Two for the fence and one for the miter. I used a type of double slotted T track that has both miter and T track slots. You need the T track as a way to hold feather boards.
My top is two layers of 3/4 plywood. the base is glued and screwed together, and the whole thing is bolted to a top that it shares back- to-back with a sander. Very stable.
When you have to drill the insert to position your router, take the face plate from the router and mount it on the insert with a centering pin and hold it in place with double faced tape. The centering has to be perfect. The only way to do that is to use the faceplate as a drilling guide.
http://routermaniac.hubpages.com/hub/How-to-Build-your-Own-Router-Table--a-Step-by-Step-Guide
One of these wrenches comes in handy.
http://www.sommerfeldtools.com/Wrenches/products/556 /
Here's a dust collection port you can make easily. I generally don't like Gorilla glue, but I used it on this and it holds the PVC to the plywood. No signs of any problems.
http://www.woodworkingtips.com/etips/etip020726ws.html
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It's also nice to have one of these power switches at knee level: http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page 401&rrt=1
Last year when I was dealing with all this, a lot of the guys here gave me good advice. Here's a link to the thread. The third post by Neil Brookes helped clarify my thinking. http://groups.google.com/group/rec.woodworking/browse_thread/thread/6cea4da9d88eef76/e51fd8da4f7e17fd?lnk=gst&q=kimosabe+router#e51fd8da4f7e17fd
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