router table openings?

Page 1 of 2  

A simple search in google's image of "router table" (20 pages) shows a lot router tables have closed router door (lot of very basic assembly are open, but I am talking about "nicer" ones with drawers, etc). I wonder how come many have closed area where router would shed wood into confined area? I am planning to build a router table and it would have an opening in the front (have to, since need access to the speed switch), angled slope to roll the wood shed down to the floor (yeah, on my shoes).
I thought about vacuum and openings to the side, but couldn't think of a good design with that. I want drawers for bits.
What you have? Pictures? Recommend websites?
Chuck
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Chuck wrote: What you have? Pictures? Recommend websites?
Me have "closed-design". Allows greater suction for dust evacuation through 2.5 inch dust port in the back. So most of the make-up air is brought through the bit opening, helping to reduce the dust on the tabletop. Built according to Jointech plans. Tom
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Correct me... if I create a "air-tight" closed area in the router area, this would cause more shed to go through the top vac port?
Chuck

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I wish that I had the space for a dedicated router table. I'm collecting design info and parts sources for an extension to my table saw. I'm jealous!!

open,
am
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
C & M says...

You can make a fold-up table. Just mount it to the wall on hinges.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@spamcast.net says...

But MY wall is full of clamps :-).
I did make a saw extension router table. Works fine for me, but I'm a hobbyist, not a professional. Most router tables are way too small. And if they aren't they take a lot more room than I've got in my 12' x 14' shop.
--
BNSF = Build Now, Seep Forever

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I can't think of a single reason to have an open cabinet. Mine has two doors, easy access to the router when needed, easy dust collection. I've not hooked the DC to it yet, but I use a shop vac on the fence and just shovel out the space around the router once every few weeks. My switch is external mounted for ease of use and safety. Once I do get around to hooking up the DC, I may have to allow more in, but that is suject to trial first. The doors are not gasketed, the opening around the bit is open, and there is a hold I made for the cord to the switched receptical.

I have the Benchdog table. Drawers and door. Works for me.
--
Ed
http://pages.cthome.net/edhome/



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
When I did few samples (about 4 or 5 little raised panel doors), I have a deep shed behind the temp table (all open, just four legs). It's about shoes height. You telling me it doesn't happen often to you? Am I making a lot use of it (almost at least 3 times a week)?
Chuck

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I use the shop vac in the fence so unless it is a dado or other closed cut, much of the dust goes that way. I've not done raised panels but I'm sure that would make more volume to remove.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
A well-designed router table will include dust extraction from below and above. The air movement will also help keep the motor cool. The door in front helps with the dust collection and reduces the noise. My router table has a switch on the outside in front, where it has easy access. Norm has a very good design, including lots of drawer space for router bits and router accesories.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I know about adding a switch on the front, I am planning to do it anyway. The issue (or question) for me is should the router area be closed?
To me, it appears that open router area seems best due more open air to cool the motor. But you saying having two vac (one on the fence and another in the closed router area) help circulate the air better (meaning the incoming air would be from the gaps around the doors?)?
Maybe I am missing the information about this. Pat Warner website didn't explain this? I don't mind doing this, but I need to understand the reason. Please explain to me and thank you!
Chuck
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Keep in mind that I am still using a shop vac, so one hose for the top of the fence. Some day when I have better shop, then will consider a dust collection.
Is the sole propose for closed area router area is for dust collection?
Chuck
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

A shop vac has limited value. The closed area reduces noise and provides improved dust collection. Most doors will have a few breather holes to allow for the air exchange. In your case, I'd put off building an enclosed router table until you purchase a DC. You can "go simple" with a sheet of 3/4" ply with a hole in the middle for the router bits.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'll disagree with that.
Shop Vacs work GREAT with router tables if the holes are in the right place. Design the box so the air enters through no more than (2) 1" holes, with a second 1 to 1-1/2" connection behind the fence.
I have a DC and a SV, and the SV is better with routers, in and out of tables, plate joiners, hand held sanders, etc... The DC kicks ass with jointers, planers, the band saw, etc... The DC would also work well with the router table if sufficient intake air is available. IN other words, make more vent holes when you get a DC.
Think high speed, lower volume air with the vac, lower speed, much higher volume air with a DC.
Spend $20 on a an "Auto Switch" at Sears, and the vac will start with the tool and run for a few seconds after the tool stops to clear the hose.
Barry
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Oh, and my switch is on the right hand side of the table. I find myself on that side more often. It has a bar on it so I can power off with my thigh.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I am designing like what Leon said (I think it was Leon), with two wheels in the back and tilt the table to roll on wheels.
Chuck

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Sat, May 28, 2005, 6:17pm (EDT+4) snipped-for-privacy@toast.net (CNT) A simple search in google's <snip>
Ah, someone that's googled. But, you would probably have been more ahead if you'd just done a regular google. However.
I'm not back, but saw this thread while posting for some input. I've been told I think differently from most other people. Possibly. I do know I get somewhat puzzled when I read posts like this. Unless you're planning on making plans, and selling them, I wouldn't worry so much about it if I was you. Just make something that satisfies your wants, and needs, and esthetically pleases you.
My router table, about the Mk III model, is basic. The original was put together out of scrap 2X4s, and a chunk of plywood for the top, put together mostly with glue (Titebond II - gotta get some stock in that company), maybe a nail or two, and bolts to bolt the whole thing down. That didn't meet my needs, so was torn apart - as much as possible, Titebond really holds - and as much as I could salvage, plus some more scrap wood, made the second version. Repeat, for the next version. Can't recall if I redid it again, or not. Still basically the same. The top has about a 2" hole where the bit goes thru. I took apart an earlier router, and absolutely no sawdust in it. I think you'd have to have a pretty severe slant of the top, to have the chips/sawdust slide off on it's own,. It just pushes out of the way on mine, by the piece being worked, and I brush it off with a wide paint brush later. If I ever need a fence on it, I'll just clamp a piece of 2X2, or 2X4, on. It does exactly what I want, and need, it to do, and I really don't care what anyone thinks of it's looks. If my needs for it ever change, I will have no hesitation into remodeling it again, or tossing it, and making another - this one might have around $2-2.50 in it - for the bolts.
JOAT Failure is ALWAYS an option. - JOAT
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Don't try again. This is not the place.

again.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Sorry. I didn't pay attention to what group I was on - I should have posted to abpw. I won't do it again.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I've got one of the open ones, but my observation is that most of the chips go out the back of the fence, and not down the opening. The plan I built the fence from suggested an optional vacuum port on the back side of the fence so I made it, and it works really well.

As above, make a vacuum attachment behind the fence. Just cut a couple of triangles that attach to the backside, and mount a piece of 1/4" ply or hardboard to the top with a hole for the vacuum. Picks up most of the mess, and you're free to do whatever you want under the table.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.