Router Table

Page 1 of 2  

I am shopping for a router table. The BenchDog Contracter model seems attractive because it sits on top of a bench and can be put away.
Are any other brands really superior? I'll be doing some sheet work, and doing raised panel doors for cabinets.
I have another machine called a WoodRat for doing joints such as dovetails, tenons and mortising work.
Gary Curtis Los Angeles
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Make your own.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I have and like my Bench Dog, but I question your choice of contractor model. Using a contractor model and making raised panels just does not seem to be the best solution. You also mention sheet goods. How big? It is a 24 x 16 top whereas the full top is 32 x 24. I'd opt for the longest fence and widest table I could handle. But that is just me.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I am interested in the contractor model (bench-top) in order to save shoproom space. My shop is under construction, and I see other guys wiggling like sardines just to manuever through equipment standing on the floor.
After it is used, the bench-top can be stowed on a shelf, or hung on wall bracket.
When I say sheet goods, I wouldn't be routing a whole 4x8 panel in one shot. Small pieces. Probably the largest at 16x24, same size as the table top.
My question comes up because I see equipment with digital height gauges and micrometer fences. A few people I know spent $1000 on their router set-up, not including the router itself.
What's up with all that? The BenchDog (small one) comes in at $239. Their split fence with T-slot channels looks sophisticated.
Gary C.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Edwin,
The first part of your response got cut off. I'd be interested to read your full message about BenchDogs.
Gary C.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I have the big sucker and I use it with small to medium size piece. The t-slot and split fence are great and I have mine connected to my dc....sucks all the chips down and out throught the dc. I know space problems, but if you plan on using the router/table much, treat it like any other floor tool....you'll be more at ease and do better work. I had my old one part of my table saw and for the amount of floor space it takes, I'll never go back to the old way.
Cheers John

-
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 17 Jul 2005 12:21:50 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net wrote:

router set in my tablesaws extention table, a overhead "pin" router and a horizointal router table... all with dedicated routers ...
Honestly the Benchdog is a top notch table... BUT I do not think you will be hanging it on the wall.... on a shelf or under the workbench maybe but not on the wall....
I understand you point about the sardines...because after 40 years as a serious woodworker my shop is way over crowded... lol...happens its just a matter of time....LOL...
As for digital height guages micrometer fences, router lifts etc..
I Ain't got none..
And have no real need ...or desire,.. for them...
IF I had the space...and IF I were "buying" rather then making a New Router table I would be looking at a table that held two routers and had a pretty large table area...
Lots of luck.... all I can say is I absolutely love my Benchdog which I purchased to do just one job for my daughter out of state...worked so well it now is my primary router table in the shop... and yes I did have to make room for it...
Bob G..
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 17 Jul 2005 10:31:11 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net wrote:

I built mine in under 8 hours, using a Rousseau plate, MDF, Formica, some scrap ash, and biscuits. The fence was a gift, and is not really required. Shop made fences are fine.
<
http://www.bburke.com/wood/images/routertable2.jpg
MDF is heavy (good)
Rousseau plates are cheap (good)
Practice and experience (good)
A bench mounted version would be even easier to build.
Why buy?
Barry
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I weighed the pros/cons of making my own against commercial. I was really drawn to the designs of the Veritas router table system, especially the fence system. I bought the fence, router table top, and sled and built the stand myself from plans in their manual. Its not for everyone, but I am very pleased. Their fence with sled seems to have more tricks than other fence systems I've looked at. The table top is probably as strong as anything out there, since its solid 3/16" steel.
Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bob,
The Veritas equipment is actually about 20% less than competitors. How does the steel table mount to the base or legs? And how does a miter guide move across the top without T tracks in the top? And how is the noise (because of the steel)?
The top is fairly small. Does that cramp your work in any way? (I've run out of questions.....grunt!)
Gary C.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If you look at the 'tech' instructions online when viewing the table, you can see that it has four threaded bolts for mounting welded to the underside.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The top has some studs built in to the underside. Per instructions, I bolted some boards to the underside which act to prevent the table from sliding around. The top sits on top of a shop-built stand using the weight of the table+router to keep it stable. It seems to work well.
The right angle sled is attached to the fence for cross routing. I think the fence made by Mast-r-lift works the same way. The fence and sled are very robust. The sled has adjustable bolts with nylon tips that limit vertical and horizontal play between the sled and the fence. I would guess these will wear over time, but they can easily be adjusted to take up any wear. In practice, there's no discernable wiggle between fence and sled. Its a very stable set up.
Yes, the top is relatively small (16 x 24). The fence has adjustable clamps so that it can be attached in any direction. For cross routing, the fence is mounted front to back, instead of side to side. This makes the table size much more effective. If I ever have a need for a bigger surface, I guess I'll add some side supports, like the wings on a table saw. But for my applications I have not found it to be limiting yet. What's really important is how rigid and flat the fence-table top combination is. I think the veritas setup is as good or better than anything out there in this regard.
Routing is loud anyway and I wear hearing protection, so I have not evaluated the noise factor.
Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Hey Bob, I've got the Veritas router system on my wishlist, but I was wondering about the sled. Looking at it, how well does the sled maintain its 90 position against the fence? Visually anyway, it appears prone to skewing rather easily.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote in message

I wondered the same thing (looking at the pictures). I bought it with full faith that its returnable. The fence and sled are "big as your wrist" sturdy. I'm very satisifed with the stability. I think its more rigid than a miter track.
Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I've got the Veritas router system on my wishlist,
I backed into buying the whole system. Originally I was just going to buy a sturdy bench dog metal insert to mount the router in a shop built table. So I was looking at about $80. Then I looked at labor and materials added and it was within striking distance of the Veritas router table top. So I bought it. Well, Lee Valley includes a video of their whole system with the table top. After I saw what all the fence/sled did, I had to have it. Lee Valley allowed me to purchase the additional items and still get the package price ($324). The attributes of the fence are really not apparent on line or when looking at their manuals.
Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If there's not too much to list, what extra qualities does the video show in regards to the fence and sled? I'm gung ho on most of it, but I'm still trying to imagine what the sled can do aside from stuff like box joints.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote in message

I tried to write words to explain it in response to your question and I couldn't do it well. I think I'll revert to the tried and true posting of pictures in alt.binaries.pictures.woodworking. I'll mention some of the gadgety features here and use the pictures to show how they are used.
1. Veritas has some optional "position stops" that can be clamped to the edge of the table. See http://tinyurl.com/92jak . By using four of these on either side of the fence, you can release the fence and slide it along its axis. Your workpiece can be clamped to the fence and moved with the fence to perform some operations more easily.
2. The sled can be locked to the fence and moved as a unit with the fence using the aforementioned position stops.
3. The lower half of the fence splits and can be spread up to 8" wide. This allows you to stick an long piece of wood through the fence to perform some types of cross routing operations.
4. The sled has a built in adjustable set of metal reference keys for cutting finger joints.
None of these options provide features that cannot be performed using other jigs and fixtures. But combined they provide very convenient and flexible configurations in an integrated rigid, precise system. Wooden jigs and fixtures are easy to make and get the job done, but its hard to beat machined metal for precision and longevity.
I used position stops coupled with the sled last weekend to cut a seried of parallel slots to make some F-clamp holders for my clamp stand. My thinking while working with this set up was "wow, it doesn't get any easier than this". I also purchased the optional magnetic dust chute. This has proven to be much more useful than I imagined. There are numerous routing configurations where the behind the fence vacuum will not do any good. This magnetic dust chute can be positioned anywhere on the table with or without the fence. I'm surprised how many situations I've used it already where I placed it out in the middle of the table to catch the dust. Since its magnetic, you are not constrained by the location of fence slots or miter tracks and you can adjust it to any angle and very close to the router bit.
Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Thanks, I appreciate the detailed response.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote in message

I mentioned the position stops. Over the weekend I became acquainted with the value of these simple devices. Once you get the fence set for a position that you plan to repeat, you can install a couple of position stops to mark the fence position. This allows you to remove the fence or reposition it to make lighter cuts and iteratively approach the full width of the cut back to the "locked" position against the position stops. Its a dirt simple concept that can be applied to many fence/table setups. These happen to be small and elegant and very reliable to set.
Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I like the micro-adjust mechanism. Have you played with it at all? Seems like it would make it very easy to sneak up on the exactly routing depth one requires as well as making the action repeatable if you have to change it in mid stride for a different rout.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.