Router recommendations

I've narrowed my search down to a couple of routers, mostly based on price. Both seem to be at least fairly regarded. One is the Hitachi M12V that I can get for $161.00, and the Dewalt DW621 for $179.00. I realize the Hitachi is higher powered than the Dewalt, but as a non-pro (weekend putzer) I'm not sure if it is needed. On the other hand with the extra ponies it is still a tad cheaper. The router will be mounted in a table and will stay there. Anyone have any thoughts/recommendations/tales to tell on either of these. Thanks in advance,
Paul
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On Sun, 08 Aug 2004 16:53:30 GMT, "Paul in MN"

hitachi.
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PC690
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Rumpty wrote:

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I have the M12V which I got from Amazon with a sale special for $135. Thought I would only use it in a table but now use it for almost all jobs instead of my Craftsman Random Height Adjustment Router. I've read good things about the DW and I'm sure either would be fine. Hitachi doesn't have a dedicated 1/4" collet and uses an insert to accommodate those bits. If your using 1/2" bits primarily it's great.
Jerry
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Paul in MN wrote:

I just bought the Hitachi and have about an hour of or two of making sawdust with it. Even though it is a rather heavy beast, it is very easy to control. I actually find it easier to handle than my 1 HP 1/4" Craftsman. The smooth start is quite nice, the location of the switch and depth lock are quite convenient, etc. Keep in mind that the only two routers I have actually used in the past 15 years are the Craftsman 1 HP and Hitachi M12V.
If you throw in a couple bits, you will hit the magical $199 that will qualify you for a $25 discount.
Mike
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My suggestion is to know what you will be doing with it. If you decide at some point to make raised panel doors with the horizontal bits, or other tasks that use a large bits, then power and variable speed matters a lot. You can still do it with lower powered routers, but it will take a lot more passses. If you will only be doing profiles like roundovers, etc., then either will be fine. If this will be your only router, don't count on it staying in the table.
I know how important price is, but if at all possible don't let the price be as much of a guide as functionality.
Wayne
By the way, I tried making some raised panel doors with one of the large bits and I gotta tell ya, my Porter Cable 690 was not the tool. That big panel raising bit (3+ inches in dia) needed a lot more power and a lot less speed.

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Hi Paul I second his recommendation on not letting price be your guide. And no single router does everything well. I got by with a single router (a large one) for a few years and I could do almost everything with it. However, now that I have four different routers WW is a bit more fun and easier. If I had to go back to only one it would be my Triton. A common mistake made by those getting into routing make is to grossly underestimate the cost of good bits. Most people I know have more money tied up in bits than in their routers. It's very easy to spend $25-45 for a single good quality bit. Therefore , cheapening on the router does not make a whole lot of sense in the long run. Good Luck, JG
NoOne N Particular wrote:

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On Sun, 08 Aug 2004 16:53:30 GMT, "Paul in MN"

As having less women in your life is a key to happiness, having more than one router is, also.
Get yaself the beefy 3hp, variable speed routah fer the table and get yaself a sprightly job fer da other work that needs to be done.
Don't buy any router that only handles 1/4" bits.
Don't buy any routah that is less than a horsey and a half - anything below that is a trimmer and not fit for a rounded life.
I'm a Porter-Cable Dome Top guy myself, but it's not a religious issue with me and I also own a Dewalt 2hp ( but happen to think it's a pos in comparison).
Considerations, such as the availability of aftemarket appendages comes into the decision mix, and once again, I'd steer you towards the PC.
Don't set any store by the fact that it might be able to handle a 3/8" bit - I've never seen one in the wiild.
Regards, Tom.
Thomas J.Watson - Cabinetmaker (ret.) tjwatson1ATcomcastDOTnet (real email) http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1
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wrote:

Thanks all. I think I'm going to go with the Hitachi to set up in a table set up. I may build my own instead of buying which will give me enough left over to buy another smaller unit as well. Thanks for all the info.
Paul
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Paul in MN wrote:

dose either have a spindle lock, I got a makita, nice router, but it doesn't have a spindle lock and it's an endless source of frustration with the knuckle breaker wrench set up, especially in my table. it may be a little silly thing but I'm never getting router with out one EVER AGAIN!
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On Mon, 09 Aug 2004 10:29:18 -0400, Richard Clements

I have a stable of routers, some with spindle locks, some with dual wrenches.
dual wrenches wins every time in my shop.
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snipped-for-privacy@thanks.com wrote:

lock the spindle and then pull one wrench I have to hold the other hand on the table to keep it from scooting around.Imademinetallenoughtopull the motor out to change bits anyway and its impossible to hold still with one hand while pulling the wrench with the other.Evenintherouterbase you have to try to try to hold the router from moving while working the wrench, its a whole lot easier to put two wenches side by side squeeze them together with one hand while they both pull against each other with the same amount of leverage.OneofthereasonsIreplacedmysearsrouterwas because it had a spindle lock but didn't have the other nut to use two wrenches so to tighten it down I had to sit/lay on it sometimes (sears collets have to be real tight to keep the bit from moving).Ithinkall the reviewers who say routers need a spindle lock haven't changed enough bits to know what they are doing.
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I have one of each. For years I used the 621 for both table and hand-held use. When I decided to get a second router for dedicated table use, I bought the more powerful Hitachi for the table and now use the smaller and lighter Dewalt for hand-held.
For strictly table use, either one would work, but I'd go for the extra power of the Hitachi.
On Sun, 08 Aug 2004 16:53:30 GMT, "Paul in MN"

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I have two recommendations....
1. 1/2" shank plunge router is best in my opinion, you can always make it stationary, but you can't make a non plunge router into one. Being 1/2" you will have lots of power for using those large bits too.
2. Stay away from the Sears routers with the big "ring" that you have to screw to adjust the bit height. They are a real pain if you are trying to adjust the height from under a router table. The rings tend to be really hard to turn unless you are part WWF wrestler.
Todd
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I whole heartedly support point 2. I had one of those for about 9 months now. I had to use a strap wrench to adjust the height. Last time I tried to adjust it ( after blowing out all of the sawdust with compressed air ) I spun the whole motor in the base. That did a job on the plastic.
Now, why on earth did I buy a craftsman, you ask. Well, I had one for 18 years and it was great. The bearing began to wear and the cut eas getting wavy. The craftsman was the only thing that fit my old router table. A couple of month later, I built a new table becaus the panel raising bit would not fit thru te opening of the old table. Craftsman router adjustment freezes up. Not a happy camper.
New insert and PC 7518 router due to be delivered by UPS on Friday. This, I hope, will be my last router for the forseeable future.
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Al Reid

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There's a pretty good comparison chart at www.americanrouter.com, about halfway down the page -- in pdf format -- it's next to the Milwaukee router....
gear snipped-for-privacy@sympatico.ca (Todd) wrote in message [snip]
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