Router questions when using a router table

I just got done with my router table and have started using it. I was wondering what to do when routing the end grain of boards to get a smooth finish like it does going with the grain. Should I do multiple passes...... feed the piece slower, etc. Also I bought a Bosch router set, 1617 EVSPK, and was wondering how you know where to set the speed. It seems that the larger the bit, the slower the speed and the harder the wood, the slower the speed... or at least that is all the manual states. I"m sure it is something that goes along with experience but just looking for a general rule...to get me started in the right direction. Thanks for all the comments and help. Palmer
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Since it is end grain, it will never be as smooth as the edge. I find a slower feed rate helps though. I also start the end by climb cutting for a tiny bit to prevent tearout. You can also use a backer board for this.

I have that same router in my table. I like it a lot.
A three inch diameter bit will have a tip speed much faster than a one inch diameter bit. Too fast can be dangerous. There are guidelines published by Woodzone. http://www.woodzone.com/tips/router_bit_speeds.htm
Bit Size (Diameter) Max Speed (rpm)
0-1 24,000 Up to 2 18,000 Up to 2-1/2 16,000 Up to 3-1/2" 12,000 .
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On Mon, 21 Feb 2005 04:23:12 +0000, Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

I do everything suggested: 1. Multiple passes, with the first passes taking out only a small quantity of wood 2. Slow feed with the first few passes (depending on how much wood needs to be removed), but not on the final ones as too slow a feed may result in burning. 3. Climb cutting for the first one or two passes. But I end my climb cut before it reaches the other end as I have experienced tearout if I do the whole thing. 4. I use a square backer board along the fence.
And I still occasionally get tearout.
--
Luigi
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wrote:

try a spiral cutter.
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On Tue, 22 Feb 2005 01:04:37 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@all.costs wrote

I think #4 should be #1. Also if you have cuts to make along the grain direction, do those last so any tearout will be removed..
Bridger, timely info with your router doohicky! Usually I try to use a flush trim bit but my project was a bit too strange (round) and your trick was ideal...
-Bruce
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On Tue, 22 Feb 2005 19:22:29 -0700, Bruce wrote:

I agree with bridger on the spiral cutter if you're cutting a rebate, but I was thinking mainly of doing profiles on endgrain (e.g. an ogee thinks weegie). Unless bridger has a source for spiral cut profile bits?

Agreed.

What's bridger's router doohicky?
--
Luigi
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On Wed, 23 Feb 2005 09:58:06 -0700, Luigi Zanasi wrote

Current issue Fine Woodworking. A router jig to flush trim plywood edging.
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On Wed, 23 Feb 2005 19:19:44 -0700, Bruce wrote:

Bridge, I hate you. After years of trying to balance routers on an edge, trying to build wider "platforms" & clamping them on, buying a trim router thinking it would help, planing off the veneer with a block plane, trying to trim large panels on the router table, you had to come up with this!
--
Luigi
who just got his FWW today.
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wrote:

hee hee...
neener neener!
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So where are the free plans?
;-)
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sometimes orange water gibbon bucket and plastic." -- Mr. Burrows
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wrote:

ah.. a profile... I missed that part....
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glad it helped.
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On Mon, 21 Feb 2005 04:07:57 GMT, "Palmer"

try a helical bit.
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Edwin has given you some good information. Backing up the stock is good. It is similar to usiing a zero clearance insert on the tablesaw. The block needs to fit tightly against the long grain side of the board so cut the end grain first.
Climb cutting (feeding from left to right on the router table) can help but you must be very careful because the router will attempt to pitch the work across your shop and chew up your fingers.
You also got at least one point. If the profile will remove a bunch of wood, make the cut in several passes. Move the fence to adjust the depth of cut.
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Some table operations are pressing the art. They may not be safe or they're overly complicated. As a rule, in those instances, the hand router takes over handily. See the simple templet at the http://www.patwarner.com/rat.html link, for example.
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On Mon, 21 Feb 2005 04:07:57 GMT, "Palmer"

===================For end grain the General rules I have used are
GO SLOW... Make Multiple passes
then reach for some sand paoer...
Bob Griffiths
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passes......
I usually use sanding to smooth out the end grain. Jim
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Since nobody has mentioned it yet... Always do mutliple passes....much safer. Mark

passes......
know
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