Router question


New to woodworkign and thinking of buying a router although I never have used one. What can one be used for and what is the difference between a pluge cut one and a fixed cut one? (Or whatever).
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stryped wrote:

If you a need, you'll know what you need it for.
A plunge router has a movable base that allows for, well plunge-cutting, while a fixed based doesn't. For hand use, the plunge base is often handy -- think making a stopped cut in the surface of a workpiece w/ vertical entrance/exit. If used in a table, the plunge feature isn't of much use although many use one as double duty.
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www.patwarner.com
Go here, read and then come back and ask your question again.
Bob S.

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Also, the old adage "you get what you pay for" is as true for routers as any other power tool. Buying a cheap router, with a sloppy depth lock, will make you not want to own one any more. You will also ruin expensive wood.
As Bob's link indicates, the router is a very versatile tool. Even a good, capable machine might be your smallest investment. There are lots of accessories that allow you to do a variety of operations.
RonB
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http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&pR609&catQ&ap=1 is a very nice one. (In older literature the "plane" was dropped from "router plane" often....)
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Dr. Juergen Hannappel http://lisa2.physik.uni-bonn.de/~hannappe
mailto: snipped-for-privacy@physik.uni-bonn.de Phone: +49 228 73 2447 FAX ... 7869
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Juergen Hannappel wrote:

Say, you don't know if the blades for that are compatible with a Stanley #71 router, do you?
er
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Yes, I don't know. A router plane is on the very long list of planes that are still missing in my cellar^H^H^H^H^Hshop, and this very new one (is it shipping already?) even more so...
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Dr. Juergen Hannappel http://lisa2.physik.uni-bonn.de/~hannappe
mailto: snipped-for-privacy@physik.uni-bonn.de Phone: +49 228 73 2447 FAX ... 7869
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Juergen Hannappel wrote:

It was on impulse power that I approached this old thing. Now I look at it the narrow blade has been filed down to a nub (still a little time left on it), and I'd like to replace the blades.
er
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stryped wrote:

Fixed base router is set for a specific depth of cut. A plunge router can have the depth of cut changed during operation. Normally you set the plunge router for a maximum depth of cut, start it with the cutter above the surface and plunge it into the timber for stopped grooves.
A router is used for edge treatment of timber (roundovers, ogee etc), trimming edges flush to sides, cutting rebates, trenches etc.
There are plenty of books on using a router. Try your local library.
A router table can be very useful for making your own moldings. It is not necessary to go with a very expensive table initially.
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I agree with what's been posted so far - get a nice router (at least $100, Bosch, Porter-Cable, Dewalt, etc) with a 1/2" collet. Pat Warner's site is helpful, and I'd also recommend looking at general woodworking books, or books specific to router use. One useful accessory to think about is an offset sub-base - I think these are recommended and maybe even sold at Pat Warner's site. I have one from Rockler that was designed for use as an edge guide, which I've found very handy. http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page 24 Have fun routing, Andy
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In fact, some very nice router tables are shop built. Lots of ideas on the internet and Woodworking magazines. Again, it doesn't have to be elaborate.
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