Router Planing

Planing with the router worked like a charm. From making & setting up the jig to planing both sides of the first slab took about 3 hours. Will do th e second slab, later.
I want to thank everyone for all the info & links, regarding this technique . It was of tremendous help and ease. I've been enlightened. I feel l ike a real woodworker, now!
Last night, we had dinner at my brother's house and I was extolling the vir tues of the router planing, and commented on how much sawdust it created (n o dust collection was used). A year or so ago, my nephew came over to cle an the shop, his youngest boys "helped" by paint-brushing sawdust off the t ools. I paid the boys $20 each, for their work. After I commented about t he amount of sawdust the routing created, Ian, age 6, asked Jonas if they c ould come over and clean the shop.... and mentioned $20. The Little Booge r remembered that initial cleanup and the $20. We had a good laugh. *Anot her benefit of router planing? **And I suppose I may, now, be bound by a p ermanent cleanup contract, every time I mention sawdust.
Ian, in the black shirt: https://www.flickr.com/photos/43836144@N04/135813 08863/
Sonny
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Consider yourself lucky that he wasn't seeking a raise from last year's project. :)
With the amount of dust that was created, hope you're using a decent dust mask and eye protection. You might want to look into some effective dust collection.
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On Monday, May 26, 2014 9:08:53 AM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@none.com wrote:

Yep, mask/"hairnet" dust masking, plus a face shield. An attic fan was (ho pefully) drawing some debris its way, but there was still lots of sawdust f lying all over the place, most of it wet/green wood. The 1.5" router bit w as chewing away wood, like crazy.... 1/16" to 1/8" depths of cuts, dependin g on the passes.
Sonny
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On Monday, May 26, 2014 8:58:18 AM UTC-5, Sonny wrote:

e jig to planing both sides of the first slab took about 3 hours. Will do the second slab, later.

ue. It was of tremendous help and ease. I've been enlightened. I feel like a real woodworker, now!

irtues of the router planing, and commented on how much sawdust it created (no dust collection was used). A year or so ago, my nephew came over to c lean the shop, his youngest boys "helped" by paint-brushing sawdust off the tools. I paid the boys $20 each, for their work. After I commented about the amount of sawdust the routing created, Ian, age 6, asked Jonas if they could come over and clean the shop.... and mentioned $20. The Little Boo ger remembered that initial cleanup and the $20. We had a good laugh. *An other benefit of router planing? **And I suppose I may, now, be bound by a permanent cleanup contract, every time I mention sawdust.

1308863/

Did you make that draw knife chair? It looks really good.
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On Monday, May 26, 2014 10:37:04 AM UTC-5, Michael wrote:

Shaving horse. Yes, thanks. I had always wanted to make a shaving horse, by hand, and its lumber is from the same walnut trees we had cleared on the farm, where we torn down that old cypress house and cleared the surroundin g area. The trestle table lumber and root ball slabs are from one tree an d the shaving horse lumber is from the other (mostly firewood and turning b lanks) tree. There are still some scraps, trunk pieces and the root ball, of the "firewood" tree, out there, and I'm still picking and choosing thro ugh some of that, for other possible projects and turning blanks.
The shaving horse: Hand splitting the log, for the seat, was a tough job. The log didn't want to split. It was from a limb of the tree, not from t he trunk. Hand planing was okay, but again, it was labor intense, for me. I wouldn't want to do that too often. The rest of the project was much ea sier and more fun.
I doubt I'll ever use the shaving horse for anything significant. I just w anted to make and have one. The boys like to play with it, on it, at time s, so it's a fun "toy" to mess with. Jonas and the boys are at the farm, now, and I've considered taking the bench, out there, for something more to do, in our idle time, among the other things we mess with. When the boys were cleaning the shop, we tinkered with making log legs (on the shaving ho rse. I showed them what it was and how it's worked) for a slabbed log benc h. Ian claimed the bench for himself and wants it at the farm. I've been wanting to bring it to the farm and we can work on those legs, when conveni ent.
Sonny
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On Monday, May 26, 2014 11:26:35 AM UTC-5, Sonny wrote:

, by hand, and its lumber is from the same walnut trees we had cleared on t he farm, where we torn down that old cypress house and cleared the surround ing area. The trestle table lumber and root ball slabs are from one tree and the shaving horse lumber is from the other (mostly firewood and turning blanks) tree. There are still some scraps, trunk pieces and the root bal l, of the "firewood" tree, out there, and I'm still picking and choosing th rough some of that, for other possible projects and turning blanks.

. The log didn't want to split. It was from a limb of the tree, not from the trunk. Hand planing was okay, but again, it was labor intense, for me . I wouldn't want to do that too often. The rest of the project was much easier and more fun.

wanted to make and have one. The boys like to play with it, on it, at ti mes, so it's a fun "toy" to mess with. Jonas and the boys are at the farm , now, and I've considered taking the bench, out there, for something more to do, in our idle time, among the other things we mess with. When the boy s were cleaning the shop, we tinkered with making log legs (on the shaving horse. I showed them what it was and how it's worked) for a slabbed log be nch. Ian claimed the bench for himself and wants it at the farm. I've bee n wanting to bring it to the farm and we can work on those legs, when conve nient.

Shaving horse. I guess I knew that. I want to make one, but I'm sure I woul d use it only once in a blue moon. I used to enjoy using my drawknife for projects that I now do via electricity (saves time and wood). You have to b e careful with a drawknife though. That's what happened to my half-brother. ($1 to Roy Underhill.)
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If the wood was wet/green, you can probably expect some warping down the line and have to level the surface again.
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