Router mounted biscuit joint cutters

Dear All, Does anyone have experience of these cutters?
Any tips/tricks in their use?
Any guidance would be gratefully received.
Merry Christmas!
Regards Andy
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snipped-for-privacy@alstec.com (Andy) writes:

They work fine as long as you always want the holes along the edges of large flat square boards. The first time you have a miter or a floating connection, you'll need a regular biscuit cutter.

I just drew two pencil marks 3/4" apart and eyeballed the bearing from one to the other; got a good enough slot each time.
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Andy - I have the Sears Craftsman version that was about $40. I'm a newbie, so my skill level isn't all that great. However, it was somewhat difficult to use. I had trouble getting the height set just right, and the natural motion of the router took some getting use to with the attachment on it. I ended up having to re-do some boards that I'd spent a lot of time joining just right. Somewhat irritating.
As I said, I'm a newbie, so maybe someone with more experience and skill would have better luck.
I wish I had taken my $40 and put it with another $130 and bought a DeWalt or PC (preferably the PC) plate (biscuit) joiner. My advice would be buy a dedicated plate joiner - preferably the PC.
Nick

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I used the "Rout-r-bisc" for a couple of years until I bit the bullet for a PC 557. I used a Whiteside slot cutter sized for the biscuits with a couple of different bearings to compensate for the different sized biscuits (10,20, 0). Worked fine... but a little slow and no chance to do a flat panel. I'll make you a deal on the unit and the slotcutter...

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I thought about getting one, but decided it would be awkward to use, and impossible in some situations. Instead I spent $55 on a used PC joiner. It isn't as nice as the new ones, but seems to be adequate.
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I use a biscuit bit from Eagle in my router table and have never felt the need of a dedicated biscuit jointer. Also use it as a slot cutter.
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They will not cut slots in the middle of panels and that is a common operation. You would be better passing and going for the real thing.

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They work well. Easier to use in a router table, more control. If using the router hand held then either buy or make a jig, makes life a whole lot easier. If you want to put biscuits in a panel then use a straight bit to rout a slot.
snipped-for-privacy@alstec.com (Andy) wrote:

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If you put the slotting bit on backwards it will cut the slot, or at least one, but makes a lot of smoke. Joe
Andy wrote:

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I have one. If one of the boards you are joining is slightly bowed the biscuit slots will not line up with the other board. This is not a problem with a hand held biscuit joiner.

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Hi All, Many thanks for your responses; its great to get the sensible feedback from those who have tried it!
As the price of dedicated biscuit cutters is coming down I'm going to go without the router cutter.
Merry Christmas and a safe and prosperous 2004.
Best regards Andy

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