Router Micro Height Adjustment


Does anyone have a reasonably easy solution for this? I often wish I had a micro height adjustment feature on my router table. But I don't. Neither does the router that's in there. So every time I want to adjust the cutter height I have to struggle against the upside down plunger springs and if I get within 1/4" of where I need to be I feel I've done well, especially if I haven't injured myself in the process. What I'm thinking about is something like a very small scissor jack or screw jack that I can place below the upside down-hanging router and (with the table bolted to the bench) be able to push and also release the jack to fine degrees to give me some measure of control. I've looked to see but I can't find any way of removing the plunge springs which are inside steel tubes.
Anyone have any ideas? Are there router tables sold which incorporate a micro adjustment feature or is that always a function of the router itself?
Thanx FoggyTown
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I was under the impression that the springs were usually removed for router table use. What kind of router do you have? LV has a step detent device for routers in a table. http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=1&pC039&cat=1,43000
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
2 step solution...
First, get a router that will allow you to remove or disengage the springs. Amazon has the Hitachi M12V (3 1/4 horse, variable speed) for all of $130 right now with free shipping.
Then, route a plate/lift into your table to mount the router. Pick any one of a hundred plates on the market that offer above-the-table fine/micro height adjustment. Personally, I'm partial to the Woodpeckers Plungelift. http://www.woodpeck.com/plungelift.html Others seem to like the RouterRaizer.
Myself, once fall comes I'll be buying the Bosch 1619evs and a Plungelift to match. I've already got a Woodpeckers aluminum plate in my table but I want a bigger router.
http://www.ruckover.com/router/page2/images/IMG_0547.jpg

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If you are suggesting the purchase of a new router, why not one that is built to fit into a router table and has micro adjust to start with. PC, Milwaukee, and Triton to name a few offer this feature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I just mentioned one that happened to be particularly inexpensive right now. People don't always appreciate hearing that the easy fix for their problems involves dropping $500. Also, the Hitachi is one of the more popular routers for table use. Marc Sommerfeld and John Lucas, two people I've learned a lot from, both swear by it.
If he does want to buy a more expensive router that is a little better suited right from the get go, just read a few more paragraphs. How much more strongly can I recommend the Bosch 1619EVS than by saying that I'm buying it myself?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
James E. Cannon wrote:

You missed Leon's point. The Milwaukee and Triton are self contained table ready. No added lift is required. I bought the Triton last year on sale for $250 and that was all I spent to get micro adjust in the table.
Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

$500 is about double what you whould have to pay for a good router.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Alternatively, if a new router is not an option, will your current router/table setup allow you to replace the plunge base with a standard fixed (non-plunge) base? The fixed base for my Dewalt usually lives in my table, and the big depth adjustment ring works quite well as a (relatively) fine adjuster. Probably not as good as a true micro adjust, but lots easier than trying to plunge it up from under the table. Or, (now I'm really thinking crazily) if you can't get a fixed base, what about somehow hooking a strap/band clamp to both sides of your table, and running it under the router motor, such that when you tighten the band clamp, it raises the router just a little bit? You'd need to secure the strap to the router so it couldn't slip off, but it might be an idea to start with... Good luck, Andy
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Easy is not cheap. You can always buy the Benchdog setup and a good router to go with it. www.benchdog.com Even the slightest of adjustments are easy, repeatable, and hold constant.
There are other similar systems of varying price available. I would think a fixed base router would be easier to adjust also. Or find a way to get the springs out. If one man put them in there, another can figure a way to get them out. Perhaps if you tell us the brand, someone that has already done it can help you.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
My TR12 (hitachi non-variable speed) lives in the router table with a router razier. The RR was about $90.00 shipped in, works well if you rotate your router so the hole is at the front instead of the back of the plate.
There have been some people make their own with a fine pitch threaded rod and a pawnshop ratchet and socket.
Alan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"foggytown"

As Ed said "Easy is not cheap". True. However, is your budget is strained to the breaking point, try this, get a dial indicator and a short stool. Before I purchased the Jessem Master Lift, I would set the bit using an old dial indicator. Worked fine.
Dave
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I put a new Freud router in my table. It comes with an above the table adjuster and lock. Works great! It even raises enough to change the bit above the table. About $168. Love it.
Jim

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No way! I bought a "new" one last year (FT2000E) but it doesn't have that feature (which I'd really like to have). Looking at http://www.freudtools.com/woodworkers/rep/power_tools/Plunge_Routers/html/Plunge_Routers_1.html , you got the FT1700VCEK 2 1/4 hp? At least mine is 3 1/4 hp. (And I'm supposed to believe that I get a whole extra horsepower out of 2 extra amps?)
- Owen -
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
foggytown wrote:

First off, if they put springs in your router, you can take them out. What kind of router is it? You may get more specific answers from the group if you tell such details.
Small scissor jacks are great for making router lifts. Go for it--it's a good cheap solution. No need to run off and buy the latest trendy tool. (OTOH, if you've got plenty of $$, that Milwaukee begins to look attractive....)
H
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
http://www.leevalley.com/hardware/page.aspx?c=2&p@361&cat=3,43715,43727
I have to make a router jack. For this you can make a 4 sided base out of 4 pieces of wood that look like _ |_( , seen sideways. Draw all sides together and stand up. Put a top on it, and drill and inset a T-nut.
Then make a spinner out of wood, a circle with four nobbies, that you can spin by hand, and put a carriage bolt through it, secured over the top with a nut, on top.
-
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
If you have a scissors jack it works great, you just have to lock the plate in place, and have suface to rest the jack on. My fence straddles the plate and locks it down, and the adjustment is very fine. I use it with a the large Dewalt plunger.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.