Router Lifts - the next generation?

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Give a good finish.
UK practice is that shapers have collets, and the ones with the shaft, large head and separate knives are called spindle moulders. My shaper experience has been something of a disappointment, because the edge speed is too slow for optimum cutting. Spindle moulders use the same rpm on a much large cutter diameter, so they're OK.
--
Smert' spamionam

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In defence of that router lift, they also showed a model with the same construction but is mechanically operated, not digital. It was $200 less I believe.
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IMHO still too high. You can buy a new router with router lift features built in, in the $300 range.
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You are correct; plenty of negative comments were made. And yes, the Jessem should be compared to the PRL.
David
Never Enough Money wrote:

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You will get more variation from other factors. Your Router / Lift combination doesn't have to be super accurate. A slight warp in the board, a little sawdust under it or between the fence, some flex on the tabletop or fence, sanding, effects of humidity, etc. will negate the accuracy to 1/1000" from any tool. And, what about the rest of your project? Anything you cut with other tools will be less accurate, and as soon as you start sanding.....
So, reasonable accuracy and a well built, easy to use accessory is the key. I use a PC690 under my table without a lift. Eye-balling, a ruler with 1/64ths graduations and most importantly, set-up pieces and test pieces, does the trick for me. Would I like a lift? Yes, and will probably buy one some time. But the height adjustment accuracy won't be the top priority.
Michel.

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Sun, Oct 24, 2004, 9:44am snipped-for-privacy@sympatico.ca (MJT) says: <snip> most importantly, set-up pieces and test pieces, does the trickfor me. <snip>
That's about what I was thinking. I don't have a router lift, and don't need one. But, if I ever do, I've always figured on making one from an old car scissors jack I have sitting around.
JOAT Eagles can soar ... but weasels don't get sucked into jet engines.
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(MJT) says:

IIRC the latest WoodSmith or Shop Notes magazine has router lift plans that use a pipe clamp and short pipe for lifting the router.
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On 23 Oct 2004 14:19:19 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Never Enough Money) wrote:

Because it's way too expensive for a router accessory. It puts a regular router into a shaper's price range, without the extra power and sturdy base.

Not to nitpick, but a 128th of an inch is only about .0008" I was under the impression that anything closer than a 64th (.0016") was considered extremely accurate and fine craftsmanship when it comes to woodworking. What is it you intend to rout that needs a tolerance of .0001"?
It's also important to note that there is going to be an accuracy tolerance on the lift, and it is not going to be one thousandth. I run a couple of $60,000 saws, and the initial tolerance is .002 for those. No way is a router lift going to beat that for $500. You still have to measure when you set up- it'd just be easier to fine tune.

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Not to nitpick, but I think you have an extra "0" to the right of the decimal in each of your numbers above. But I absolutely agree with your point. This is WOOD working, not metal fabrication.
--
Alex -- Replace "nospam" with "mail" to reply by email. Checked infrequently.

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By Jove, you're right! Thanks for the correction...
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Just so we remain completely accurate....
My caculator says 1/128 = 0.0078 = ~ 0.008. You had an extra zero. That's eight times less accurate than a 1/1000'th machine.
Similarly 1/64 is close to 0.016, not 0.0016, as you say.

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[snip]

Good point. I may be mixing up the term accuracy with the term precision.
However, from a logical point of view it is incorrect to say a $600,000 saw can be a $500 in everything. The $60K mama probably has much more horsepower and a bunch of other stuff -- that's true. But just like a hang-glider can make a sharper turn than and F-16 Figher, a $500 saw might be able to beat a $60,000 saw at _some_ things.
I'm debating your logic _not_ whether your statement that a $60K saw is better than a $500 one. If the router in question is much lighter or smaller it is possible that a $500 lift on a $250 router could be comparable to a $60K setup that is much bigger an requires more mechanics to solve the precision/accuracy problems.
Just my, 2 cents - not trying to start a posting war.
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On 24 Oct 2004 07:41:02 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Never Enough Money) wrote:

I think what 5 figures gives you aside from a half a ton of iron is CNC....
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On Sun, 24 Oct 2004 09:21:06 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@thanks.com wrote:

and a major tax write off..
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On Sun, 24 Oct 2004 09:21:06 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@thanks.com wrote:

Yep. But it's way more than a 1/2 ton of iron- probably more like 3 or 4.
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On 24 Oct 2004 07:41:02 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Never Enough Money) wrote:

It could be, but it seems a little unlikely, given that the router is not built into the lift, and the lift is not built into a table. Also, as an FYI, the expensive industrial equipment is usually not that much more complex mechanically, it is just much sturdier, and less prone to losing it's adjustments if you bang it a little.

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Never Enough Money wrote:

Looks like someone(s) lacking basic wooddorking skills will soon be out five hunnert dollars.
UA100, who to be truthful, has relied on a $250,000 router (at work of course) from time to time...
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Ouch.
Actually, after all the "professional" feedback, this woodworker will NOT drop money for the lift. Even if the feedback had been "it's great you've got to get it" it would probably not have happened -- it's so low down on the priority lists.
The real question is what kind of woodworker, I'll refrain from the derogatory term "worddorker", would by a $250,000 router? That seems high even for a factory floor. Is it for mouldings? Surely it does more than route.
BTW, I am tired of reaching under my table and repeatedly adjusting measuring, adjusting-measuring, etc. until I creep in on an accurate enough setting......
Also question to the whole group, not just UA100: given all the anti-router lift pro-shaper feedback, I'd say none of you uses a router lift. I find that difficult to beleive. Surely there's someone out there willing to 'fess up.

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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com says...

Yes I like it. I got tired of going under the table to fiddle with the height, now its just a matter of turning a crank from above. Another thing is the height is repeatable. I've tried that without the lift with just a router, again more fiddling and its basically hit or miss.     Bottom line is I would buy it again without question. The only thing that made me put off buying one for a couple of years was the price. I should of bought it sooner which would of saved me alot of aggravation.     Now to the nifty digital one, would I buy that one? Probably not because what happens when the electronics fail? I can rebuild a mechanical one if need be, but electronics forget about it.
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I don't think any home shop will have one, but it is not all that out of rance for a procution ship. I've beenin factories that make speaker cabinets. I'd guess at an investment of $15,000,000 or more. And that was not one of the biggest.

I have a Benchdog. Paid $230 for it. Did I need it? No. Did I want it? YES. I enjoy using it and it makes adjustment easy and I can sneak up on any measurement. Would I pay $500 for a digital? No, I have a limit to my toys and could not justify that much money for my use. Benchdog seems to have eliminated that model and now only sells the "pro lift" at about $100 more. Ed snipped-for-privacy@snet.net http://pages.cthome.net/edhome
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