Router for router table

I'm looking into building a router table soon and before getting into that, I'm thinking about the router I would want to have in there. I have a PC690 that I do NOT plan to use since whatever goes in there I'd rather leave. In order to have something that's easily adjustable, the two main candidates are a) a fixed-base router with something akin to the "Router Raiser" or a plunge router that has a microadjustment feature accessible from the top. The obvious advantage to the plunge setup is cost. However, I've read conflicting accounts of the usefulness in practice of the microadjustment of some plunge routers. Does anyone have positive or negative comments about the current crop of plunge routers and their effectiveness and ease of use in this scenario?
todd
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that,
PC690
In
of
Have you considered the Triton Router? It was specifically designed for router table use. Review at http://www.onlinetoolreviews.com/reviews/tritonrouter.htm
Cost may be a factor though.
Regards,
Dean Bielanowski Editor, Online Tool Reviews http://www.onlinetoolreviews.com ------------------------------------------------------------ Latest 5 Reviews: - Woodworking Techniques & Projects - Kreg Right Angle Clamp - Bosch 3912 (GCM12) 12" Compound Miter Saw - Dowelmax Doweling System - Ryobi CDL1802D Pro Series 18v Cordless Drill ------------------------------------------------------------
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Sounds great but where do you find the 160 volt outlet for the 3.25HP motor?
Marc
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I have the Freud 2000 and "Router Razier" in a modified "Norm" router table. It has worked well. Only complaint is in changing bits, the collet does not come above the table. I like the variable speed and the soft start.
One thing that I can find no use for in a router table like Norm's is the plexiglass door to the router area. I never look in there when it is running so why have it clear and a static generator to collect dust.
BRuce
Todd Fatheree wrote:

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BRuce


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Bruce,
Go here http://www.sommerfeldtools.com/ and search for Bent Wrench. I believe you will find 2, one for a Hitachi and one for a PC. As I recall, I ordered the one for the Hitachi then filed it open to 27mm to fit the Freud collet. My Freud router is dedicated to the table so I've done some simple modifications like removing the springs, opening the base and adding a cable pull to the collet lock. When I want to change bits, I raise it up, pull the cable for the collet lock, use the bent wrench and change the bit.
Bob S.
<BRuce> wrote in message

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thanks Bob, I will go look now. mine is also dedicated but I have not gone as far as you have. Would removing the springs have any advantage since I am using the router razier? I will definitely look at a cable pull for the lock. prying it with a screwdriver and holding it open with a pencil are getting old. :-) I even tried the MCLS extender but it adds too much and i can't get most of my bits low enough.
BRuce
Bob S. wrote:

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BRuce


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Bruce,
I have the Route-R-Lift by Jessem and by removing the springs (and handles) it allowed about another 1/2" of travel. Simple task. The top of the knob on the Freud router adjustment knob pry's off (use a pen knife blade) exposing the nut you need to get at to take the assembly apart. I packed all the "spare" parts together in a large plastic baggy and stored them someplace so I wouldn't loose them..... now where was it I stored them..?
As for the cable to the collet, if you're going to do it , I could send some pics so you can see how to do it. I didn't take any pics during the process but I think they would show enough for you to figure it out. As you're aware, the collet is a double lock. Break it loose, then turn it a few turns, then another turn for the final unlocking.
The 27mm bent wrench is the way to go. I found that out from John Lucas at www.workshopdemos.com when he was showing a demo for some CMT products which included the Hitachi router and CMT bits etc. I have an enclosure built around my router with a 4" DC port attached so I rarely ever have to pull the router out of the box except to blow it out every few months..
Bob S.
<BRuce> wrote in message

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Todd Fatheree wrote:

I have four seperate Router tables set up in my shop ..one conventional Benchdog "store bought" unit... one in the wing of a Table saw plus a a horizontal and pin router set ups or tables.....
ALL have a Cheap DeWalt 710 mounted in them (the 1 Hp unit..150 buck one..not really sure if 710 is the correct number)
I just do not need a extremely powerful router... Nor have I felt the "need" to buy a router raiser set up...although I may "want" one in the future especially in the router mounted in the Table saw wing...since it is mounted at such a low height ...
For General hand held use I use the PC with both the fixed and plunge bases...again not an overly powered router..
Bob Griffiths
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Bob G wrote:

I think you mean the 610.
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Ever watch "The Router Workshop" on PBS?
The ease of performing all operations _on_ the router when it is lying on the table convinced me I didn't need any shaper wannabe setup. I got the LV circular base and hung one of the M12V Hitachis, sans springs, underneath it. Out, in, setup bars and clamp-on fences sure make for a comfortable operation.

that,
PC690
In
of
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Bill,
I think Freud may have borrowed their micro-adjustable fence idea from Pat Warner http://www.patwarner.com/routerfence.html which he designed several years back. It was featured in FWW two years ago and I built one using the instructions in the magazine article and a couple of emails with Pat. Well worth the effort too.
The big difference - and it is significant, is that on the Freud, there is very little support on the fences. And while you can micro-adjust them, they flex under slight load. During lunch, I stopped by the nearby WWW and they have this on demo. The fence alone is $149. It looks good and feels good but having used the one designed by Pat and comparing them, they simply didn't carry their design far enough. You can get precision adjustment but you can't maintain it I guess is the easiest way to explain it. Also, there is no dial indicator on the Freud, the adjustment markings are stamped on the knobs in increments with one full turn being .050".
The split fence is a good idea if you need it. Pat Warner's design includes that also but on my next revision, I'll be eliminating that feature since I have yet needed to use it. By eliminating that, I can eliminate an alignment step also. When adjusting the opening for the bit, both fences then need to be adjusted to be coplanar. Same deal on the Freud.
If you need precision then I think the Freud misses the mark - wait for Version II, or build one yourself or buy one from Pat.
Bob S.
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