Router Collet - crack?

I have an older Rockwell router - sorry, do not have the model number. I am using it to route some half lap jointsa on some older doug fir for flooring and siding.
When feeding some of the boards into the router (on table) they will splinter badly - sometimes casusing a need to rip the board ont he table saw and start over. If I change the direction of the feed - to be with the rotation of the bit, the router will not bite into the grain as much and the wood will not split.
However, after a few passes on a few boards, the bit starts to work it's way out of the router, gradually rising. I've had it apart several times, and I'm certain that it is tight enough. However, the collet, is not symmetric. It has two vertical grooves on the outside. THey appear to be for the function of absorbing the tightening and slightly compressing the collet - to hold the bit. But, on this collet, one of the grooves is actually cracked clear through. At least I think it is cracked.
Does anyone know if this could cause a bit to loosen?
In the meantime, I can conitune to feed into the router rotation if I increase the fence for several passes of smaller bites. Time consuming, but effective.
Robert
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Robert Gray wrote:

DON'T continue to use a router that has a faulty collet. Think of the physics involved with a piece of steel turning at 20,000+ RPM. Be safe and either get a new collet or a new router. $200 for a new router is pennies compared to the damage that a flying piece of steel can cause.
If you have a band saw, cut out most of the waste wood on the lap joints before using the router, then you'll only have to make a relatively light clean-up pass with the router.
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wrote:

snip
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absolutely.
Robert, your rockwell router is probably an early version of one of today's porter cable routers. you may be able to get a replacement collet for it. determine first if the collet is in fact cracked. if it is, replace it or discard the router. some other things that could cause slippage:
worn collet. replace it
dirty collet or collet seat. clean the parts with something like brake cleaner or alcohol and a qtip. don't use paint thinner or gasoline, and make sure everything is completely dry and the fumes are gone before you start it up again.
worn or undersize router bit shank. replace the bit.
dull router bit. sharpen or replace it.     Bridger
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One other thought to add to Bridger's list, make sure you lift the router bit about 1/16" before you tighten it.
Greg
snip

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