Router bit temperature

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Verrrrry Interrrresting. Even the Frenchmens I knew in Northern Ontario never used it.
P D Q

The term Pepsi is more a local Quebec phenomena. It is not as widespread as 'frog'.
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Okay, here is what you do: stand up in an east Montreal bar, near the docks, and yell out: "any pepsis in here?"
And you WILL get confirmation that the term exists and that it is derogatory.
(Make sure you have an ambulance waiting.)
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Almost enough to make me think it originated with the FLQ generation.
P D Q

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"Robatoy" wrote
I suppose it wasn't fair to assume that my American friends would get that reference.
Check item 3, 5 and 6 here:
http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=pepsi
***************************************************
I am proud of you Robatoy.
You finally gave us an Urban Dictionary definition that had nothing to do with a blatantly sexual reference.
Geting old??
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I'm doing what I can to behave myself, but some stuff is just too funny not to share.
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And whatever you do, don't look up what a 'rusty trombone' is.
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wrote in message

If you drank Coke, you wouldn't have that problem... You'd have Coke all over your monitor, keyboard, and half your desk. :-)
Puckdropper
--
If you're quiet, your teeth never touch your ankles.

To email me directly, send a message to puckdropper (at) fastmail.fm
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"Puckdropper" <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote in message

I've got the cat toy only version, but don't use it as often as I might anymore. 10 minutes with the cat and the two mini batteries are dead. At $5 a pop each, playing with the cat started getting too expensive.
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I suspect you were actaully reading an average temp for the area around and including the bit. The (what you said) thermometer that I have has an 8:1 field ratio. I think this means that for every 8 inches you are away from the target, the reading is taking the average of a 1" diameter circle. I also bought one of the HF pocket sized IR thermometers. It's pretty neat, too, but it has a 1:1 field ratio, so if I was 8" from a target, I'd be reading the average temp within an 8" diameter circle. I use carbide tooling in my metal shop and its easy to get the tool up to 800 or 900 degrees. In the wood shop, (I'm a poor router guy) I have easily gotten HSS router bits hot enough to turn them Blue. That's about 570 F and the lowest temperature where "temper colors" show up is about 450 F, (straw").
Pete Stanaitis ---------------
Morris Dovey wrote:

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spaco wrote:

Hmm - I hadn't thought about that. I took the reading with the nose about 3" from the router bit, so might have (by luck only) gotten a more or less decent reading of the average bit temperature. Even so, it was still a lot cooler than I would have expected with an ambient temperature only 11F cooler.

Double "Hmm". The HF thermometer might actually have been better for what I wanted at the time (checking heat re-radiated back thru the glazing of a solar panel). I'll stick with the one I've got because it's probably better suited for the fluidyne R&D, but I'll keep the HF pocket version in mind...
(Thanks!)
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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The little HF pocket model goes on sale for $9.95 now and then. It is surprisingly repeatable. We use it to test for cool spots on 5 gallon batches of a dispersion we mix up. It does easily detect .1 F differences, although we only need to know to about 3 or 4.
Pete Stanaitis ------------------------
Morris Dovey wrote:

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Snip

I wonder now, ;~) what the temp of the bit is during actual cutting. I wonder if possibly the bit cools down substantially by running at 14,000 rpm between the time of the completed cut and when you turn the router off. Either way I agree that faster feed speed helps in keeping the bit cooler.
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Leon wrote:

That reading was taken while the bit was cutting.
One of the nice things about CNC routing is the "no hands" aspect that left me free to aim the thermometer at the part of the bit down in the dado while it was cutting (moving away from me).
Around the quill there's a home-made dust shroud - you can see it near the bottom of http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/Projects/Bevel/ - with a 4" connection back to a 1-1/2 hp HF dust collector, but I don't think it really does much to cool bits.
I have more of this stuff to cut tomorrow, so I'll get more readings...
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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Morris Dovey wrote:

It's tomorrow already. :-)
I reinstalled the dull bit (not a particularly good move, but I was curious) and cut four MDO parts with it. The highest temperature I could record while cutting was 105.3F - with most of the readings scattered between 92 and 97F.
I put an adhesive red dot on the bit and set it aside for sharpening - and made a note to myself not to try cutting more than one sheet of MDO with a single bit. :-(
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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Yup.. me thinks it's the adhesive. That stuff was a bear to work with. How about exterra? [sp?]
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Robatoy wrote:

Extira is great stuff for signage because of its moisture resistance, but otherwise it has all the characteristics of MDF. I thought about it and decided that people deserve better.
I don't mind using up bits -- actually I mind /not/ using up bits <g> -- and am going to be looking for a better grade of weather-resistant plywood.
What I'd really like is nice 3/4", 4x8 sheets of acrylic-faced 11-ply baltic birch (or even non-baltic non-birch) made with a machine-friendly exterior glue, that I don't have to buy by the container load.
It may be about time for Mason Pan to open a store here in Iowa...
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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That might be the case up to a point in some materials, but when cutting acrylic at high speeds, it heats up the bit rather than cooling it off. Material choice, feed rate, spindle speed and bit design all enter into this complex equation. The chips are supposed to carry away heat as well. One of the people at the CNC workshop was burning her maple till the instructor backed off the spindle rpm but kept the feed rate the same. That worked much better. I'm told that aluminum is a biatch in that regard. It's all about chip removal.
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