router bit preferences


Personel preferences...
As I was looking at the router bit sets (CMT at this time), I am learning more...
I like the OGEE style for the stile and COVE style for the raised panel. There are three raised panel styles I found myself: OGEE, COVE, and FLAT (I just call it "flat" since there isn't a name for it?). My brother-in- law has both ogee for the stiles and panels, I didn't like it. So, if I had moola to spend right now, I would buy CMT 800.517.11 (that would be ogee stile and cove panel).
The reason I am bringing this up in here is because I am trying to look for a "match" for smaller style, like CMT 800.524.11. I am trying to find something to do a (total) 5" wide door (technically it won't be a door) that would match the rest of the other doors. Or am I making a big deal out of this?
CMT 800.524.11 has FLAT panel and ROUNDOVER stile CMT 800.517.11 has COVE panel and OGEE stile
I know I could buy individual bits, which will require a credit card.
BTW, how come some panel cutter do not have a "back cutter"? Is it another personel preferences? That means the panel will stick out more while a "back cutter" will produce more even stile/panel? That's the reason?
I have to yet buy (or make?) panel template (I like Roman style, maybe will consider Cathedral for a kitchen). Who knows, I might change what I like with bit styles, just that the bits are expensive.
Chuck
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Backcutters have pros and cons.
We'll do the "pros" first:
1. One less step in making the panels 2. Tongue matches grooves every time, once set up with shims.
Now the "cons":
1. You can't drop the bit down into the table to take light cuts, so the only way to avoid tearout is to swap bearings, when you cut a non-straight panel edge, such as for a cathedral door. You can just move the fence out a bit for lighter cuts with a back cutter, but you can't do that when you can't use the fence such as for cathedral doors.
2. Possibly it's more expensive, if you consider you already have a suitable bit for cutting the back side before purchasing a raised panel bit, because I'd figure a RPB with a backcutter costs more than one w/o.
3. More of a pain to get the tongue precisely the right size. You have to carefully adjust the height of the bit each time you install the bit.
Dave
CNT wrote:

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I see. As I been doing (with raised panels), I pass with 1/4" at a time (three cuts). I see what you mean by if not using the fence. Interesting... Is the propose for "starting pin" is to help take turns in cuts? (I don't understand what is the "starting pin" for)

So, it's common practice to take the bits apart for cleaning or sharpen? I thought I just buy the (3-pieces) set and use it until it dulls, then take it to have it sharpen once, and after second dull, it's garbage?

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I make the last cut of multiple passes about 1/32" when making stuff like crown molding. That's a chatter-prone process. The depth of cut on the last pass depends on the wood and what bit you are using. You'll get a feel for how deep, how fast, etc, as you gain experience. There's no "one way" to route all projects in the same fashion. You'll have to make allowances for some cuts.
I've only taken my bits apart to change shims or bearings. Carbide lasts quite a while. A diamond stone could be used on the flats. Don't reduce the cutting diameter by grinding the beveled edge. Basically, you can safely "lap" the cutting edge (the back side).
Dave
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Sorry, I wasn't very clear. By "allowances", I mean that you'll modify your technique for particular woods and bits.
Dave
David wrote:
You'll have to

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In the interest of safety, you can make light cuts without changing bearing (my panel cutter doesn't actually have a bearing) and without moving the Fence. I have a stack of 1/4" thick cedar board that I spring clamp to the fence. Make a cut, remove one of the board, rinse, repeat. You make light passes in the horizontal plane versus the vertical plane. Got this tip from one of Pat Warner's books.
And, my God, please don't tell me that someone is using a panel cutter with a starting pin. Sounds like a great way to lose a finger.
Chuck
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WHAT is the starting pin!? I know what it looks like, but what's it for?
Chuck

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A pin that sticks up out of the router table surface near the bit that you set your work up against and slowly pivot the work on the pin into the spinning bit. It gives you a bit more control when starting a cut with out the help of a fence.
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Something to think about, the flat cut raised panel bit leaves a some what easier to sand and or scrape smooth surface than the curved raised panel bits.
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Actually, as I was practicing (still using the $60 ones), I notice I have the COVE panel and ROUNDOVER stile. It looks good to me (but that was all in pine lumber, not tried on red oak yet).
So, cove/roundover looks like in between flat and ogee, still easy enough to sand.
Chuck

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