Router bit for cutting Deep mortise

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I wish to cut 1/2" wide mortises all the way through a fourbyfour (cutting from both sides of course). Was just about to order the Amana bit# 45426 which is a double-fluted straight plunge bit, with 1/2" shank, 1/2" cutting diameter and a 2" cutting height.
Will use a DeWalt 2.25HP Router. Is the above bit adequate for this job (or do I need to look at spiral-fluted)? Just because the bit has a 2" cutting height doesn't mean I should plan to try to cut more than 3/16 to 1/4" at a time, right?
BTW, Swingman, you were right--there are more bits than I thought out there! I assume that since I have a plunge router that I'll be able to extend the abilities of a single bit a little. For instance, using a bit with 1.5" cutting height to cut a 1" deep groove. I know, of course, that one should not use a bit that is too much longer than necessary due to deflection and vibration, etc. I don't have any router bits at all yet, and my router hasn't even arrived yet, so I sure I'm destined to learn a great deal! I can try my hand at chisel-sharpening in the meantime.. Probably should dust off Bill Hylton's book (on the router) on my shelf...
Bill
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On 4/25/2010 3:22 AM, Bill wrote:

Just make sure that you have positive control of the router cutting holes that deep--if you don't, it's easy for the bit to grab, rattle around a bit, and break.
By positive control I mean a jig that doesn't let the router move any direction but the direction you want it to, with no play to speak of. Don't rely on hand pressure against a fence.
Found that out the hard way.
While spiral bits are wonderful in many ways, I wouldn't use one for deep mortises until I was sure I could do them reliably with a straight bit--the reason is that they cost a lot more than straight bits and being solid carbide they're easier to break.
Learned that part the hard way too.
The jig doesn't have to be anything elaborate--you can cobble one up out of a scrap of plywood and a couple of pieces of 2x4 that will do the job, but it has to keep the router under control. If you need a mortise wider than the bit, offset the router in the jig a little bit, then reverse the jig to get your second cut (and do that for each step of depth, don't cut all the way through then try to widen it--you may get away with it but it's asking for trouble).
And as Allan Quatermain said to Tom Sawyer, "take your time, you've got all the time in the world".
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Thank you for sharing both of your lessons that you "learned the hardway"--I was ignorant of both issues and was likely to repeat them--especially the one about "relying on hand pressure against a fence". Secondly, in view of all the accolades given to carbide, I did not consider it's brittleness--clearly a factor here! If there's a lesson here, it's got to be "don't take too much for granted!"
Bill
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Bill wrote:

Depends...oak or pine (hard or soft)?
Your life would be easier if you drilled a 1/2" starting hole, then a series of 3/8" holes through the 4x4 before routing.
--

dadiOH
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I believe the 4by4s will be SYP. Your idea involving drilling makes a lot of sense! Before this task is complete I may have a DP--not sure! : ) Thank you!
Hmm... Harbor Freght has one with a 2" spindle stroke for $59.99 (comments?). http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber8119
For the sake of comparison, a long spiral-fluted (solid-carbide) bit is about $68. : )
Bill
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On 4/25/2010 4:17 PM, Bill wrote:

Sometimes it pays to look around a bit...
http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INSRIT?PMAKA22-5132&PMPXNOw76327&PARTPG=INLMK32
(mind the wrap)
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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Bill wrote:

You can get spiral bits made of steel. They are sharper than carbide.
--

dadiOH
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On 4/25/2010 2:22 AM, Bill wrote:

For plunge routing, and particularly with my Multi-Router, I use "end mills", instead of router bits.
I generally buy them from:
http://www.travers.com/prodlist.asp?RequestData _Search&q=end%20mill
You can get much longer "end mills", they work much better for deep routing, and they are generally longer lasting and much less expensive than router bits of the same ilk.
Call Travers, tell them what task you are doing with the end mills and what your needs are, and they will tell you precisely what you need without you having to wade through the countless choices on their web site/catalog.
Trust them ... good company with excellent, well informed sales staff.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 4/15/2010
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(...i think he's ripe for a 'bot...)
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On 4/25/2010 7:12 PM, Robatoy wrote:

Not till after he's spent for the _entire_ Festool lineup...
..._then_ he'll be ripe. :)
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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More on this, routing & mortices: http://patwarner.com/router_morticing.html ************************************************************************************

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news:e213b43b-a853-406d-9a66- More on this, routing & mortices: http://patwarner.com/router_morticing.html ************************************************************************************
Looks like it will make interesting reading, thank you very much!
Bill
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Done it with a PC 693 and a long 1/2" carbide bit. 1.5 hp is more than adequate, since you can only take shallow passes without clogging the mortise with chips. Hogging out with a drill before routing is definitely advisable.
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"Bill" wrote:

Other than an academic exercise, why bother?
A 4" long, 1/2" wide tenon cut to fit the above mortise?
Lew
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Lew,
Garrett Hack used two (double) 3" wide by 3.5" long tenons at the joint of each trestle post and trestle shoe in his design (which I am more or less following). To borrow one of your expressions, perhaps be has "guilded the lily". What would you do instead?
Bill
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"Bill" wrote:

A 3" wide x 3-1/2" long tenon is a totally different world than a 1/2" wide x 4" long tenon.
A tenon that is more about 2-1/2 or 3 times longer than it's width just is poor design IMHO.
Lew
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Yes, so what do you properly call the dimension which is the short side of the rectangle which is the top of the mortise? Is the short side of this rectangle called the mortise's "width"? Clearly, from your first reply, the answer is no.
From what I can tell, it appears that common nomenclature may just be to measure the length, width and thickness of a tenon and just refer to the tenon's mortise and leave it at that. I'm sure those in industry have better terminology.
Bill
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

ERRATA:
The phrase "I wish to cut 1/2" wide mortises" should be replaced by "I wish to cut mortises having 1/2" **end thickness**".
This is in according to Terrie Noll's book, "The Joint Book".
My thanks to *Lew* for trying to maintain a decent standard for the clarity of communication around here!--and for yet another valuable lesson. "Good enough is seldom good enough..."
Bill
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Have you considered building something more simple and less costly before building the work bench? I ask, as you state the 'router has not yet arrived'. A garden bench can use the same joints and would be a perfect practice piece. Just sayin' ...
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Rumple Stiltskin wrote:

Thank you for your concern. In answer to your question, I have not a decent place to sit in my shop, nor does my new grider/grinding wheel nor my bench planer. I've been saying for a few months I just want to get out there and cut some joints!
Motivated by J. Clarke's post yesterday, I've been envisioning my routing jig throughout the day--not too hard since the router just has to be able to slide back and forth--with no wobble! I'll block each end, and perhaps on top of adjacent fourbyfours and use lots of clamps. Too bad I don't have a DP or TS--I do have a circular saw I picked up at an auction a few months ago for $7. Hope the blade's sharp! : )
I've got a few projects going on at the same time--sometimes it's too much fun! I crawled around in the attic yesterday, installing my new lighting is going to be too much fun (NOT)! : )
Bill
BTW, where did this new expression "Just sayin'..." come from? I've been seeing it in a number of places lately.
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