Router bit comparisons

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You will rarely, if ever, see an article or expose' that reflects the auto industry in a negative way on either TV or in local paper. An exception was the staged exploding GM on NBC news. Theory is that the auto industry spends way too much money on advertising.
Does the same hold true for router bits?
Almost every issue of the mags I get have THE ULTIMATE power tool comparison. Every once in a while they will throw in a TS blade comparsion. I don't ever recall seeing a router bit comparison.
Am I reading the wrong mags? (ShopNotes, Wood, AWW, WWJ, Workbench)
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RayV wrote:

Probably.
FWW did a "Router Bit Matchup" in 1999, I believe.
Also, I've seen and read plenty of negative press on the auto industry.
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Yup. the GM coverage was staged. Ford OTOH lost sales on the big Crown Vic to many police departments because of the potential of an explosion when rear ended. Also the old Mustangs had the gas tank/bottom of the trunk that would rupture and soak the occupants of the car with gasoline when rear ended. And then the Ford tucks of recent years having a massive recall because of the cruise control switch under the hood that caused the vehicles to catch on fire including the houses that they were housed in. Gosh, do you remember the Ford/Firestone news concerning the roll over Explorers? Not to mention the millions of recalls by all manufacturers that are covered by the news regularly.
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You'd think they would have learned a lesson about that from the Pinto disaster in the 70s...
--
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote in wrote:

The old Mustangs practically WERE the old Pintos. They had a very bad run of years for a while there.
Patriarch
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(Doug Miller) wrote in

The 60's Mustangs were manufactured before the 70's Pinto's.
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THOSE blew up, too? I was thinking of the Mustang II, a real disappointment of a design, as I recall.
The mid-60's designed Mustangs were an object of admiration, but for me, it was a somewhat distant admiration. We were pretty much a GM household. ;-)
Patriarch
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Yeah it was a Pinto with Mustang badges. Ford has gone back to the old style with the latest model, I hope they have sense to not reproduee the II on the next model change.

Yeah, GM afforded me the opportunity to retire at 40.
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Leon wrote:

What about the mustang wagon they may make? http://www.cnn.com/2006/AUTOS/12/14/mustang_wagons/index.html?fark
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It was probably FWW but could've been American Woodworking Journal (or some combination of those three words). The evaluations included the easily measured values - diameter, thickness of carbide, runout etc. AND quality of cut - for one type of bit. Using a CNC machine - on melamine, they routed a groove of a specific depth using a specific feed rate, for a specific number of cuts for a specific length. The tester then examined the cuts, counting the number of visible chip outs, how far along they began and some subjective evaluated point at which the chip out was bad enough to be unacceptable. The bit's cutting diameter was measured again after it had cut a hundred or so lineal (or it could be linear) feet to get some quantitative info on wear and tear.
If I recall, Whiteside performed the best. Not surprising - at least to me - Whiteside doesn't use a "special colored anti-stick coating" (read "product differentiation technique") like the Yellow Guys, the Orange Guys or the Red Guys.
Whichever magazine did the article/evaluation does some pretty well thought out tests which eliminate much of the "skill and technique" stuff that also influences the results. A bandsaw blade test for resawing used a weight wired to the stock and a pulley to get a consistent feed pressure. They used Time To Complete The Cut as one of their evaluation criteria, along with measured surface roughness of the cut surface. Seemed overkill but thorough as hell. Not up to manufacturing quality control testing but adequate for indicating which blades sucked, which were adequate and which worked very well - the stuff most of us want to know.
charlie b
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You are not reading the wrong mags but perhaps not long enough. IIRC Wood had a router bit article a few years back. The article was concerning different brand straight cut bits, how well they cut and how long they cut well. IIRC this happened just before Jesada sold out.
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On Tue, 19 Dec 2006 05:32:13 -0800, RayV wrote:

That may be the theory but the practice is that they beat up the auto industry pretty thoroughly in the '60s and '70s and got laws passed that implemented all of the changes that they were demanding (safety laws, emission laws, defect reporting laws, recall laws, etc) then Ralph Nader shot himself in the foot by attacking a major cultural icon and lost his street value and now they've moved on to other things.

How would you put together such a comparison? What criteria would you use? Seems to me that it would be difficult to put together any really objective evaluation criteria.
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--John
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J. Clarke wrote:

shank diameter balance & vibration coating quality carbide quality bearing runout shape consistency of cutters
Things I can't measure but do affect the quality of the cut and the wear on routers. They do all kinds of tests on dust collectors with flow meters and the like so critical tests of router bits could also be done.
Sure I could by the most expensive and hope for the best but that doesn't always work.
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I don't know how anyone could say auto makers haven't taken an ass whipping at the hands of the press. Anywhere from basic design flaws to their business model has been beaten to death in the business pages since the 70's and the first gas shortage.
This is probably the article on router bits that people are remembering:
http://www.taunton.com/finewoodworking/pages/w00045.asp
Robert
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Here are couple items about the way automakers/dealers, realtors, and the like control what gets in the paper.
http://www.stayfreemagazine.org/ml/broken_wall.html
http://www.ringnebula.com/project-censored/1993/1993-story9.htm
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RayV wrote:

Yeah..........OK..........but isn't that negative press in and of itself?...........
Why do you have such a bug up your butt about the auto industry?
Did a dealer screw you over? If so, choke it down and move on.
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Gus wrote:

Never said I did. I just used it as an example of how some advertisers can influence content and wondered if advertisers in WW mags had the same kind of clout. Maybe not since the target market is so small.
If anything I have a bug up my butt about 'news'papers and TV news and their alleged objectivity.

Of course not, the guy told me his boss was gonna give him hell the next day for selling me the truck so cheap.
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Not always. Wood mag did a glue comparison test and showed that TB II did better than TB III in wet applications. That is when many people discovered that TB III is merely water resistant by testing standards vs. the advertised Water proof. In Franklins eyes, Water Resistant and Water Proof is the same thing. I can assure you that Franklin was not happy with that article as indicated by their e-mail sent to me addressing that test. They also sent me a case of TB III glue to prove to me that it was good glue. It is good glue but not Waterproof.
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Hey guys, when you decide to changethe subject, could you change he subject line, too?
wrote:

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resrfglc wrote:

AMEN! I couldn't agree more. Some people are so anxious for any opening to voice their opinons they can't even connect the dots to the orignal post.
And some, like dgb even take partial post out of context (mine) and repost with another posters comments to make it seem as if I said something else. Sloppy, sloppy work.
If you cannot pay attention to the subject, then pay attention to what you are doing.
Robert
(who is perfectly capable of speaking for himself)
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