router base plate

The router base plate that i got with my "universal" table has many holes in it for different tools, ie router, jig saw etc. These many holes are useless to me and always seem to be catching the corner of wood that i am trying to rout. I have gotten a couple of steel plates pieces that are thick enough and big enough that I am going to make a new router plate. My question is how do i make the holes (4 ea ) in the plate so that they are inset to hold a beveled head of a bolt and below the level of the plate. The plate is not thick enough to drill the hole then bevel it out. I know i could buy a plate that is made to do this job but these plates came along and will be much better than the one that is one there. 1. Do I drill the holes big enough for the screw shaft then using the bolt, hammer it in place so that it creates the correct bevel? 2. Do i try to hammer in the bevel before making the screw hole? Any suggestion or comments would be most welcome. Ken, makin dust in NS
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Ken if you are about to make a base plate for the router,I would recommend 1/4'' aluminum plate or lexan use a hole saw with correct arbor to make the hole for the router bit to travel in. After that drill your mounting screw holes the same size as what is currently in the router.If you don't own a countersink,take a drill bit the same exact size as the head of the screw and drill approx half way thru the mounting plate, when completed you should have a nice beveled hole that will accept the proper screw and they will be flush with the surface.Put away the beating tools as this will warp the plate and you will end up frustrated.If the router isn't mounted properly,you could end up with damaged equipment or personal injury. Do it right the first time,you will thank yourself in the end. Have a happy and safe New year dp

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In rec.woodworking snipped-for-privacy@usenet.ca wrote:

You countersink it just like you would do with wood. If it isn't thick enough to do that, it isn't thick enough period. How the hell would it hold otherwise?
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If it isn't thick enough for a countersink, how is the factory plate made? Trying to do this by hammering the bolt into the hole is an exercise in futility. If you manage to do it, there will be an equal sized bump on the other side. Your router will not sit flat.

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