Rounding tenons or squaring mortises?

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On Sun, 13 Dec 2009 14:55:26 -0800, the infamous "Lew Hodgett"

P'raps not, Lew, but wouldn't you really rather have the squared tenons if you were seated on the wagon behind said flying horse?
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"Larry Jaques" wrote:

Putty those joints with epoxy and don't sweat the small stuff or pet the sweaty stuff.
Lew
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On Mon, 14 Dec 2009 18:59:08 -0800, the infamous "Lew Hodgett"

Aye be gar! Spoken like a true non-land-lubber, it was.
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Swingman wrote:

Hey! I promise I hadn't seen your post before I sent mine off. I just said basically the same thing using entirely different words. :-)
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See Nad. See Nad go. Go Nad!
To reply, eat the taco.
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Steve Turner wrote:

Not to worry ... happens to me all the time!
Great minds ... :)
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Easy, Use a router in a table and a round over bit. Oh wait... I use floating tenons. Never mind.
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wrote:

Easy, Use a router in a table and a round over bit. Oh wait... I use floating tenons. Never mind.
There you go, floating tennons. Round over bit for a tennon that is part of the end of a board, hard to do the entire length, the sholder will be the limiting factor.
Since you are already using floating tennons you should go ahead and buy your Festool Domino now. I have had mine about 2.5 years now and was not totally sure how much I would use it. Counting the tennons I have purchased and used so far I have cut nearely 2,000 mortises with the Domino. That is an average of about 16 mortises every week. You will find yourself using floating tennons more and more.
Come join Swingman and I down that slippery sloap. LOL
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Sloap: A soap like material that is used on a slope to make it slippery. ;~)
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Lol!! Good thing I wasn't drinking coffee just now.
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On Mon, 14 Dec 2009 08:01:51 -0600, the infamous "Leon"

S/B "Swingman and me", too. When you say the people individually, it becomes clear. "Come join Swingman down that slippery slope." and "Come join me down that slippery slope."
Hmm, inviting guys to play with the sloap with you? No comment. <knowing grinne>
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Tempting. Very tempting. I'm actually considering building a horizontal mortiser with Z axis control.
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On Mon, 14 Dec 2009 06:47:20 -0800 (PST), the infamous Brian Grella

Remember David Marks playing with that $3500 multirouter thang? Cool toy, could be built for 10 cents on the dollar. David sells it for $2695 now http://www.djmarks.com/multirouter.asp
Speaking of David, I never saw this particular video: http://fwd4.me/8Mi jigs for curvilinear wooddorking.
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Larry Jaques wrote:

Here's mine ... scroll down to "Mortises in curved work, "Method 1"":
http://www.e-woodshop.net/Jigs.htm
One of the most productive tools in a productive shop ... it's paid for itself a few times over in the time it would have taken me to build one for "10 cents on the dollar", and undoubtably will a few times more.
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On Tue, 15 Dec 2009 09:36:39 -0600, the infamous Swingman

DAYAM, dude. Do you put fully -half- of your profits back into tools for the shop? You go first class all the way. <drool>

I reckon so, but for us po folk...
P.S: I see the word "chord" in the referenced text there. You must have been thinking ahead to this conversation when you last used it. ;)
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Larry Jaques wrote:

I'm a musician by nature, what can I say ... one of those who sees triads in the birds sitting on various electrical lines.
It's a curse ...
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On Wed, 16 Dec 2009 13:49:59 -0600, the infamous Swingman

I don't think electrical line birdies resemble the Chinese Mafia at all.
-- Indifference to evidence: Climate alarmists have become brilliantly adept at changing their terms to suit their convenience. So it's "global warming" when there's a heat wave, but it's "climate change" when there's a cold snap. The earth has registered no discernable warming in the past 10 years: Very well then, they say, natural variability must be the cause. But as for the warming that did occur in the 1980s and 1990s, that plainly was evidence of man-made warming. Am I missing something here? --Brett Stephens, WSJ Opinion 12/09/09
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Interesting, I would have thought they would make rounded tenons. I know that is how the Leigh FMT works.
If you will square the slotted mortises you can make a cool tool that I learned about from Darrell Peart. Use the chisel from a square chisel mortiser as a hand tool to square up the ends. I think Darrell is having Leigh Valley or Lei Neilson or someone like that produce them commercially. I have a few ideas myself of improvememts by adding an extension that fits in the slot to line it up and an adjustment so you can hold it a specified distance from the rounded end. I am watching ebay for a super deal on square chisels. I've misswd two good deals because ai was too busy to watch the auction closely.

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The Woodrat looks like a mill machine with the sliding table upside down, and some other modifications for woodworking. Pretty cool.
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On 12/12/2009 06:00 PM, snipped-for-privacy@teranews.com wrote:

This paper from the "Dept. of Forest Industrial Engineering" in Turkey shows square-ended mortise/tenon joints to be about 15% stronger on average than round ended ones.
http://journals.tubitak.gov.tr/agriculture/issues/tar-05-29-6/tar-29-6-8-0412-16.pdf
Likely not going to be the deciding factor in the design, but if you're borderline on strength you might want to go for the square ends.
Chris
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Chris Friesen wrote:

http://journals.tubitak.gov.tr/agriculture/issues/tar-05-29-6/tar-29-6-8-0412-16.pdf
The last test by "Fine Woodworking" shows 3/8", square cornered, traditional M&T joints to be only roughly 3.5% stronger than round cornered, 3/8" loose tenons.
http://www.finewoodworking.com/fwnpdf/011203036.pdf
Somebody is obviously full of it ... ;)
Either test notwithstanding, IME, it is nothing to be concerned with. AAMOF, the 3/8", rounded corner, loose tenon joint is almost twice as strong as the ubiquitous 1/4", square cornered, traditional M&T joint.
> Likely not going to be the deciding factor in the design, but if > you're borderline on strength you might want to go for the square > ends.
Not to nitpick, but in that case I personally would first consider a thicker mortise and tenon if possible.
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