Rounding over edge-how??


Recently a friend gave me some plans to build a piece of furniture for him, and I have run into a snag. Now, I'm not an expert woodworker but have made my share of sawdust in the past and am stumped by this. The plans call for a 1/2" thick piece of wood (actually 70 of them) with a 1/4 radius roundover on all edges. The radii need to be full so that each end (which is 1/2" in width) can fit into a fixture to turn a 7/16" round end on them (to fit into corresponding holes already drilled). If I cut the radii on one side, then the bearing has a narrower surface to ride on for the remaining cuts, resulting in a somewhat lopsided radius. I cannot use a fence to hold the correct distance as the parts have curves to them that need to be followed. Any suggestions from the gang here would be MOST welcome at this point. Thanks in advance!
Tim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Guide pin in the router table maybe?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
TMC wrote:

Would a dowel maker work. You know the kind that looks like an overgrown pencil sharpener. Checkout the following:
http://www.tools-for-woodworking.com/index.asp?PageAction=VIEWPROD&ProdID '34
Deb
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Deb, I wish I had seen those sooner..or at least realized what was to come. I've already drilled all the holes at the 7/16" required measurement, and the dowel makers there do not come in that size. Excellent tip for the next time though! Even after a call to the people who made the plans, their suugestion was the same as my own-double face tape a template to each piece and rout it with the standard bit!! Thats a lot of taping and un-taping as I have about 70 pieces to do...thanks for the tip though.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Perhaps make a sled that has the same curves as your parts, and use a bearing that will ride along the sled.
TMC wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
A vacume jig would eliminate the tediaum of taping. Check out either of Hylton's books: Wood Working With the Router, or Router Magic for details.
TMC wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You could do it on a router table using the fence as a guide or the best way I think is to buy a bull nose bit.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
TMC says...

Unless you are making dowels, then there will always be a long side, right? The long side goes against the bearing, not the part already rounded.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
TMC says...

Or if I wasn't picturing things right in my other post, you could use guide pins. But the pin setup would be different for the inner and outer curves and it would only work if the curve was a radius, not if it was elliptical. If it is elliptical, then you could do it with a pattern and bushing setup.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Use a fence. It'll work and you don't even need the bearing (although it doesn't hurt)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Andy Dingley wrote:

Except his parts are curved, can't ride on a fence.
I vote for the bullnose bit suggestion...don't much like them because if the piece moves up/down any it gets messed up but that's about it other than attaching each of his numerous pieces to a template.
-- dadiOH ____________________________
dadiOH's dandies v3.06... ...a help file of info about MP3s, recording from LP/cassette and tips & tricks on this and that. Get it at http://mysite.verizon.net/xico
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Use a suitable fence. The standard refs <www.patwarner.com> ought to describe this.
One way (for big curved parts) is a "horseshoe" fence. This is a C-shaped bracket around the cutter, with two projecting fingers that guide the workpiece.
The better way for this might be a "sunken fence". Fasten a thick solid false false to your existing fence, then feed it through the cutter until there's a narrow cutout fitting closely around the cutter.
Watch for cutter snatch when working around the ends of these bars. It's probably best placing a removable pin in the table too, ahead of the cutter, and using this as a fulcrum to control things.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
increase the diameter of your bearing for the second pass

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.