round and round

I've got some 4" sq x 2" thick pieces of various woods. I need to make them as round as possible (so I end up with 4" disks, 2" thick). I don't have a lathe (yet). I've got a bandsaw, a drill press, and a bench-top belt sander (used 4x36 belts). What I thought I would do is find the center and lay out a circle; cut as close as possible on band saw; drill a hole in center and insert lag bolt and washer/nut; then spin this with a hand drill while sanding on belt sander. Other choice is making a jig for cutting circles on band saw - not too sure this will work. Ideas/comments?
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lektric dan wrote:

I'd like to think that would work; it sounds like it would be fun to watch! ; ) I *might* try it if you built a fixture to hold your piece (s) on an axis over your belt sander. Might as well do all 4 at once! : ) Disclaimer: I don't have a belt sander.
Other

Maybe you could sand them by mounting the pieces on the drill press? Adda coupla washers/nuts to an appropriate bolt with the nut cut off (gosh what did I learn here... LOL). There are probably plenty of sound reasons not to do that. But if you were going to do it, maybe a rasp would be helpful?
Hope you'll share how it comes out! Good luck! Bill
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Google: bandsaw circle cutting jig. there's lots of plans.
or try this: http://tinyurl.com/3kfb6wj
Mitch
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I've done this with thinner pieces - 1/4" plywood for centering rings for sport rockets.

Yeah, that would be another way - I think I've got a rasp I could use. One problem is, even if I use a jig for the bandsaw, I've then got to sand the disk smooth. Might as well do all the work with the disk(s) rotating.
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I don't see Google posters directly, so I'm hitching on to Bill.
There is a sliding jig that can be described for doing this on a table saw. A little sanding is required at the end but that can be nicely done.
Hole saws are good. But if you've never used a big one freehand, try it out on scrap first and make sure your first surface contact s at the same time firmly held, gentle and even while your target pieces are immobilized.
Regards,
Edward Hennessey
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"lektric dan" wrote in message
I've got some 4" sq x 2" thick pieces of various woods. I need to make them as round as possible (so I end up with 4" disks, 2" thick). I don't have a lathe (yet). I've got a bandsaw, a drill press, and a bench-top belt sander (used 4x36 belts). What I thought I would do is find the center and lay out a circle; cut as close as possible on band saw; drill a hole in center and insert lag bolt and washer/nut; then spin this with a hand drill while sanding on belt sander. Other choice is making a jig for cutting circles on band saw - not too sure this will work. Ideas/comments?
OK, you've got a drill press and a band saw - pretty much all you need, except for one gizmo described below:
1. Find the center of each piece and make a mark.
2. Draw an accurate 4" circle on top of each piece, centered on the mark.
2. With a sharp blade in your band saw, cut around the pencil line pretty close but just outside the line.
4. Now get one of these:
http://www.google.com/products/catalog?q=drill+press+lathe&hl=en&prmd=ivns&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.&biw 11&bih6&wrapid=tlif130352665312110&um=1&ie=UTF-8&cid964921236589482543&sa=X&ei2yTc-eK43EsAOR9-XpCw&ved GkQ8wIwAA#
(a big $20 plus shipping)
5. Mount the pieces in the lathe attachment on your drill press, one by one, and skin them down to exactly 4 inches in diameter. You could use a turning tool as shown (maybe another $20), or a rasp, or even a belt sander which you already own.
I'd use a turning tool, which might possibly have the pleasant side-effect of introducing you to an entirely new and extremely interesting way of working wood.
Sound good?
Tom
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wrote:

A Grizzley "Lathe Attachment for Drill Press". What I have is an old (but in good shape) Sears 8" drill press. Do you think this would work with it? I'd have to go easy to keep from loading down the motor, but if it would fit this might be the solution.
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wrote:

It's not a good idea to put lateral thrust on drill press' bearings (same with sanding, etc.). They're not designed to work that way. A small drill press like that likely won't take much abuse.
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"lektric dan" wrote in message
wrote:

A Grizzley "Lathe Attachment for Drill Press". What I have is an old (but in good shape) Sears 8" drill press. Do you think this would work with it? I'd have to go easy to keep from loading down the motor, but if it would fit this might be the solution.
Might be a little small for something like that. If you used a turning tool to shape the block, my guess is that it'd just make the belt slip, and stall the chuck. The little 8-inch Delta that I used to have would stall pretty easily, even on just a good-sized hole saw.
And krw's comment (below) is definitely true. No drill press really likes lateral thrust on the bearings, although the fact that the piece is supported on both the top and bottom relieves a lot of the stress and makes it workable for occasional use.
Tom
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On 4/22/2011 6:35 PM, lektric dan wrote:

Does it have to be 4" exactly? If it does, then I would go with your method. If it doesn't and can be a bit smaller, then you could use a 4" hole saw. You may have to cut from both sides, but the pilot hole would already be through if your guide bit is long enough.
--
Robert Allison
New Braunfels, TX
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Thanks for the suggestion. My understanding id that hole saw "cups" are tapered. Even if I cut from both sides, I'll end up with something that needs more work to sand smooth. How much does a 4" hole saw cost? This might be worth looking at.

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On 4/23/2011 10:14 PM, lektric dan wrote:

My hole saw cups are not tapered. A good hole saw is about $20 bucks or so, I haven't had to buy a large one in quite a while. If you have to buy an arbor, then it may cost another $15-20. If you get a 4-1/4" it should turn out close to a 4" hole. You would probably have to order it, though, 4" is much more common. Go to a plumbing supply or an electrical supply and try there for better selection.
--
Robert Allison
New Braunfels, TX
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wrote:

You'll probably find 4" and 4-1/4" at Lowes or Home Depot.
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On 04/23/2011 12:12 AM, Robert Allison wrote:

Be aware that hole saws that large generally require a 1/2" chuck. Your drill press can probably handle that but its worth checking beforehand.
John
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lektric dan wrote:

Any of those will work. So would cutting them out (after knocking off most on a saw) by spinning against a cutter on a router table.
The sanding you suggest would be better done IMO by mounting the disk in the drill press and spinning against the belt sander.
--

dadiOH
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snipped-for-privacy@invalid.com says...

If you want a smooth edge you're going to be finishing on a sander anyway. I'd rough it on the band saw and finish on the sander. Jigs for both are worth making. Don't have to be elaborate--a piece of MDF with a hole in it clamped to the table will do fine. Size the hole for a nail, drill a hole the same size in the center of the workpiece, drop the nail through the two and cut. Or you can make a nice adjustable jig if you want to get fancy.
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