RotoZip Tool - Anyone Using It?

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In a fit of unrestrained impulse buying I purchased a RotoZip about 18 months ago. There was a residual vision in my mind of their TV ad where the things effortlessly zips through every thing. A couple of months later I went to use it for the first time. I think I wanted to cut a circle or an arc in a piece of hardboard (Masonite) I was using to make a jig.
It didn't perform so I put it back in its case and used my trusted old Bosch jig saw instead.
Now, I was just wondering if I should have spent more time mastering its use or whether I should just leave it in the pile of other worthless gadgets I have accumulated over the years.
I am sure this group will have the answer.
Joe
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It does best at it's originally intended job, cutting sheetrock. Other than that, a router does much better at just about everything.

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wrote:

I bought one a good while back (to trim some tile to level out the toilet) the toilet is still out of level. Can I put mine with yours?
Mark http://home.mchsi.com/~xphome /
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It works really great for cutting holes in drywall. Hang the drywall, then cut out around the outlet boxes and light fixtures. Use the fixture as a guide. No measuring required. No need to buy those great big plates to hide your mistakes. The circle fixture works great on drywall too. I have had trouble using it with any other material.

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Anyone remember "Troy"? <G>
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The problem with this is the edge of the outlet/switch box will be 1/2" below the finish side of the drywall. I know some/most of the screws on outlets/switches can span the 1/2" but it just seems like a poor quality job to have the outlet/switch box not at the surface of the drywall.
I have a Sears brand of the Dremel and it is useful in some instances. Gets used a couple times a year. Glad I bought it. Not sure I see the need for a Roto Zip. Might acquire one of those small palm routers like the PC 3510.
No need to buy those great big plates to

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On Feb 5, 6:38 pm, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Just read the other responses of just barely tacking the drywall in place and cutting out the hole with the box in its proper 1/2" proud of the studs position then sliding the drywall over the box hole and finishing the drywall screwing. Might have to try this with my Sears Dremel next time I hang drywall. I'va always done the measure where the box is and cut the drywall before putting it on the wall method.
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On 5 Feb 2007 16:46:34 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Should have read this before I posted the last one. Sorry!
If you're going to try it with the Dremel (and I haven't,) I'd suggest getting one of those "router" attachments so that you've got a way to keep the bit perpendicular to the wall. Should work fine, then- but freehanding it might be a bit more trouble than it's worth, and probably not a good reflection of the potential it has.
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On 5 Feb 2007 16:38:29 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

It is. I think you missed something in the description- you rough in the boxes so that they will sit flush with the finished drywall surface, and then screw in the perimeter of the drywall and maybe a stud or two. Just what you need to hold the sheet on the wall or ceiling. Then you cut the drywall around the boxes and it pops down over them. *Then* you finish screwing it down completely.
Sounded like a crappy way to do it to me as well (I always used to layout the sheet and use a keyhole saw to cut the holes before hanging sheets) until I saw a guy actually doing it. Took about 10 seconds to make a firm believer out of me.

No real need for the Rotozip unless you're a sheetrocker or do a *lot* of remodeling, really. It's sure nice for what's being described, and saves a lot of time- but it's nothing a guy can't do with a utility knife and/or a keyhole saw. For a hobbyist woodworker or DIY home repairs, there's not much call for the thing.
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On Tue, 06 Feb 2007 02:27:22 -0600, Prometheus

If you've got sheetrock maybe. If you've got real plaster it's a godsend.
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wrote:

You are 110% correct. Lath and plaster will kill a keyhole saw in a matter of seconds. I was talking about new installation, and most folks go with premade rock these days.
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At the moment my baasement shop plans have changed. A friend said I should stud and insulate and drywall the basement walls instead of just painting the concrete white. I'm thinking I will do this. So instead of rotary hammering the metal boxes and conduit to the walls with Tapcons, I'll be putting outlet boxes every 4 feet onto studs attached to the walls/floors/joists. Lots of outlet boxes.
Still wondering about the drywall attaching. When I hang drywall I put in the screws so any wrinkles are worked out as I screw it down. Put 3-4 screws into the same stud or two in the middle of the drywall sheet. Then put screws in the studs to the sides until I get to the outside of the drywall. Like when laying laminate, you start in the middle and work to the edges or start at one end and work to the other end so no bubbles occur. But with drywall its probably stiff enough that resting it on top of the 1/2" protruding boxes will not cause any bubbles, warps to form. I'm thinking up problems that do not occur.
I'll have to try it with the utility knife and keyhole saw and see if that works. Then maybe try the Sears Dremel freehand. Then maybe buy the router base thing for the Dremel tool. Then maybe buy the PC 3510 since its a new tool and I want a new tool. Want, not need.
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On 6 Feb 2007 08:22:19 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Never really saw any wrinkles on sheetrock, but if you just run the screws along the top of the sheet, you should be able to use the technique *and* set your mind at ease. Before you zip it out, all you need is enough holding power to keep the sheet from falling off or sliding around.

Please note that utility knife and keyhole saw works best if you layout and cut the holes while the sheet is on the ground. The drywall bits have blunt ends that should not tear up your wiring, but using a keyhole saw to cut around the roughed-in box is a good way to either cut your wires or give yourself a really good shock, if the wires are live. It can work very well, you just need to measure carefully.

Sure- there's more than one way to skin a cat.
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Sadly I made the same mistake, only difference being I bought mine at Sears. The pin that you push in to tighten or loosen the collet broke the second time I used it (13 months after purchase). Sears would not take it back or exchange it. Called Rotozip and they did exchange it for a new one. The plastic housing that holds the pin broke again. Bad design of the plastic housing I think. I ended up drilling out the shaft to accept a C141-B rig pin.
Other than drywall the only other use I found was when I need to hog out a few studs that had finished drywall on the other side. Was especially helpful getting at that last stud in the corner. I don't think any other tool could have done that job.
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Joe Bleau wrote:

the router base. It worked great when I installed the can lights in our family room. I used it to make the cut outs in the dry wall and in the wood paneling for the switches.
--
Keith Nuttle
3110 Marquette Court
  Click to see the full signature.
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wrote:

A Rotozip fits in the gap between a Dremel and a router--it can take Dremel bits but has immensely more power and it can take 1/4 inch shank router bits but is less powerful and precise than a router. Look at it as a Dremel on steroids and you're pretty close to the mark.
It is _the_ tool for making cutouts in drywall and plaster--my house has plaster over drywall so in the middle of installing network cabling, having gotten fed up with all the other approaches, I broke down and got one for that. It has since proven occasionally useful for all sorts of things.
If you want to cut a circle in a piece of hardboard, the Rotozip cutter isn't really right--it will take forever to do the cut unless they've improved them considerably and the finish will be pretty poor. Get yourself a quarter inch router bit and use the quarter inch collet in the Rotozip and it should go just fine.
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Works great on hung drywall and wall paneling, period.
Len
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Once I had to attach a round flexible duct to a sheet metal duct in a basement, and the only access was from the top, between joists. The only way I could manuver to cut the sheet metal was to use the rotozip with a circle cutter. There was just enough room to get the tool and my hand in there and I could hardly see what I was doing, but it worked.
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Heck it doesn't cutout outlets in drywall very well if using plastic boxes. The hi speed bit melted through the boxes I wound up hand cutting with a drywall saw then finishing with the RoroZip and took it back.
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wrote:

Hmmm. I have no problem cutting around plastic boxes. Have to be gentle though.
Did you use drywall bits?
To get rid of the drywall dust problem experienced during cutting, I purchased some drywall bits. They reduced the dust dramatically.
Possibly, the drywall specific bits are better at cutting around plastic. (Thinking out loud :)
Gary.
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