Roofing repair question

The new place has a tin roofed shed, I need to replace all the nails in the roof with screws (the water proof roofing screws). When walking upon a tin roof (corrugated steel) can you step off the rafters and not fall through?
Mark (sixoneeight) = 618
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Wed, Jul 11, 2007, 1:14pm (EDT-1) snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (Markem) doth query: The new place has a tin roofed shed, I need to replace all the nails in the roof with screws (the water proof roofing screws). When walking upon a tin roof (corrugated steel) can you step off the rafters and not fall through?
I'm wondering why exactly you need to replace the nails with screws. Nais not holding? I'd think some caulk would work. But, your roof, your time, your money, your screws..
Based on all the tin roofs I've seen, sure you can step on the tin and not fall thru. Of course, I'd say you're going to bend the Hell out of the tin, but you shouldn't be falling thru.
JOAT I do things I don't know how to do, so that I might learn how to do them. - Picasso
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On Wed, 11 Jul 2007 15:23:31 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (J T) wrote:

The nails have a rubber gasket which are very crumbly, maybe caulk and that mobile home roof paint seems cheaper.
Thanks Mark
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In the days of my youth I walked all over tin (corrugated steel) roofs, mostly barns ... but I weighed less and the tin of today may not be up to the same standards as the tin of yore.
I would walk/stay on the rafters so as not to bend the tin ... I doubt you'll fall through.
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I weigh less 2 years ago, just not as nimble as youthful days. Maybe a sheet of CDX with rubber in places to spread the load...
Thanks Mark (sixoneeight) = 618
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Why would you have to step off? Aren't the existing nails hitting the rafters?
R
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On Wed, 11 Jul 2007 13:05:03 -0700, RicodJour

Potential clumsiness?
Mark
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I repair these roofs, although somewhat infrequently. I gave up on replacement of the nails with screws as getting the nails out turned into a real problem.
Dented tin, wallowed out holes, and snapped off nail heads. I made more work than I started out with.
Go buy some Sonneborn NP1. It is an elastomeric UV resistant caulk, and it is all I use for my roof repairs, and has been the only thing for the last 10+ years or so.
Put your sheet of plywood up on the roof so you don't misstep, crinkle or dent your deck. (The sheetmetal is only 29 gauge, and a probably a low quality at that.) Take you caulk gun, a roll of paper towels, and a stiff brush on the roof.
Brush off the nail heads to clean them. The gasket may come off, but that isn't important. Make sure the nail is secured and hasn't backed out (drive it back in if you have to.) Put a wad of NP1 directly on the nail head and rub it in a circular motion around the nail head, and then lift your finger off from the center. You should have something that looks like a Hershey's kiss. Next screw.
Spec writers for commercial roofing plans call this encapsulation, and it works. Whenever we do sheetmetal repairs on chimneys, flashings, caps, anything that has screws or rivets in it we always use this method.
The only screws I would put in would be if the roof was loose, it rattled, or the nails let go.
Here's another tip. Cut your plywood in half so you can sit and work on one, then move to the other and work your way around, rather than to have to step onto the thin metal (dent!) and move a 4X8 sheet.
Robert
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On Wed, 11 Jul 2007 21:28:32 -0700, " snipped-for-privacy@aol.com"

<snip of pro advise>
Saved and printed.
Thank you very much.
Mark (sixoneeight) = 618
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Glad to be of help.
Robert
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I think the gaskets on the new screws will beat any kind of roofing goo. When a metal roof heats and cools, there is a lot of movement going on. If you plan to use this building for a long time, consider tearing the roof off and starting all over. Eventually the finish will come off the metal anyway, even if it is galvanized. Wanna know how I know?
If you do this repair, make sure you deal with the ridge, too. The foam strips can come apart and cme out of there, allowing rain to come in when it drives hard. To get those old nails out without damaging the metal, I made an aluminum support plate for the claw of the hammer and the nail puller. It is a piece of about 1/8" thick aluminum, about 6 inches square. I shaped it so it fits right on top of the corregations of the roofing, extending to the valley on either side. That way, I can place it anywhere I need to in order to protect the roofing as I pry the nail out. If needed, a small,thin piece of plywood can be laid on the plate to add more beam strength. I don't envy you the job, but I pulled all the nails from a 12' X 16 foot door that way and reused the steel to build up a permanent wall in its place. I didn't dent the metal at all.
Pete Stanaitis --------------------
Markem wrote:

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Consider leaving the tin roof in place and covering it with a 'Garden Roof' you could do that in a few hours! Details at: www.damp-solutions.com Kind regards Joe
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