Roofing and sheeting for shed question


Can I use my narrow crown stapler to fasten the wall and roof sheeting to my soon to be built garden shed. If not what should i use to fasten this????
Help is always appreciated,
tammie
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Crown Staplers are commonly used for this type of construction.
Just a few things to consider....
Staple length should be at least 3 times the thickness of the material. If you're using 1/2" plywood, use a 1-1/2" staple.
Use galvenized staples.
-nick
Tammie wrote:

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I would add a line of construction adhesive if the shed is in an area where wind problems occur.
Dave
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It might be better to use a normal 1/2" wide hand operated stapler so that the staple does not tear through.
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Tammie wrote:

You can fasten it with anything that you want. It may not be there after the next high wind, though.
In our area (considered a high wind area) staples are not considered adequate for attaching roof sheathing, but are OK for wall sheathing, unless the wall sheathing is part of a shear wall construction.
My engineer does not allow them anywhere on sheathing, so I do not use them at all. Nails are the best method (or screws if you really want to be anal about it).
--
Robert Allison
Rimshot, Inc.
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Tammie wrote:

for the most part sheds are not covered by building codes, other than language that spells out what a shed *cannot* be. sheds cannot be larger than a certain size, cannot have plumbing, electrical, be used as a residence, that sort of thing. so for the most part how you go about constructing it is largely up to you. if you can determine that the staples you are considering will perform adequately, you are free to use them. do a test- install a sheet with your stapler and give a try at yanking it free. if it doesn't pass muster, refasten it with bigger nails or screws or whatever.
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Tammie wrote:

What is your definition of narrow crown? My fastener supplier says it is 1/4" crown of varying lengths, but in the old days we called that the soffit stapler. He sells a heavy "narrow crown" staple for some kind of gun that looks like it has a 5/16 or 3/8 crown on it, but I don't know which brand it is or what it is for. But for purposes of construction, a 1/4" narrow crown stapler is totally worthless for anything other than trim.
The 1/2" crown (15/16 ga.) is now called a "narrow crown" by some rather than the 1/4" in light of the fact that 1" crown staplers have fallen out of favor. A 1/2" crown stapler with shoot up to a 2 1/2" staple, which is plenty for sheeting and 1/2" decking.
So compared to 1", 1/2" is narrow.
Which do you have? Is it pneumatic, electric, or hand powered?
Robert
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