Roller Coaster Sanding Sequence

This is probably a simple question, but I've been sanding a table top for a couple of hours and I keep having to regress on sand paper (that is, I keep finding scratches the current grit will not take and have to return to a previous grit). I'm starting around 50 and going from there. Can someone recommend a sequence that will help to alleviate this roller coaster sanding job? Thanks, Jeb
I'm using both a belt sander and a finishing sander, I can't help but wonder if a 100 grit on belt sander isn't coarser than a 100 grit on the finishing sander. Is there any credibility to this thought?
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50 seems pretty coarse to start off with on a 'finishing' job? Any reason?
I usually start with 120 or even 160 depending on the wood and go from there...
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out of the shop and said. . .:

DFTT
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Belt sanders heat and harden the surface of the wood. Also, by their design, they lay all uncut fibers down in the same direction. Use of a cabinet scraper or plane is best, though scrapers don't work well on stringy softer woods, followed by sanding with a Random Orbital Sander or an orbital.
For now, I would recommend you break the surface hardening by wiping with a damp rag. Allow to dry, then use your finishing sander.
See what I told you about pressing the uncut fibers down?

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"Jeb Sawyer" writes:

You will keep chasing your tail until hell freezes over.
Find a commercial sander in your area and have them run it thru their 48" wide sander.
$20-$30 and it will be flat, smooth and ready for finishing.
--
Lew

S/A: Challenge, The Bullet Proof Boat, (Under Construction in the Southland)
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I don't know about the rest of you, but I usually try to start with just inside the station, then move up to the lift/launch, and then tackle the rest afterward. Only takes a few days on a smaller one, but up to a week on the really big ones. Slap on a fresh coat of paint, and the rails are usually good to go for another season.
Oh...wait a minute! This is the woodworking newsgroup, not rec.roller-coaster! My bad :)
Chris Mooney
On 22 Jul 2003 22:50:11 -0700, apt snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Jeb Sawyer) wrote:

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