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Was that irrigated or dry land farming? what was the growing season?
Up here in Saskatchewan, I can't picture that scenario. If the alfalfa isn't growing, it's probably 'cause there's no water for anything.
djb
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Dave Balderstone wrote:

Irrigated farming near Denver, Colorado. Growing season is relatively short, 90 day corn is pretty solid, 120 day corn can be dicey depending upon the year. Cool nights kept the alfalfa from growing fast, but the oats or barley would grow quick enough to mature before being overtaken.

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My guess is that it's still a long ways cheaper than the LEED Silver home I just got back from. Isocyenene ain't cheap either.
JP
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Jay Pique wrote:

AAMOF, I used a newer form of Icynene on the interior of the traditional frame walls, as well as the underside of the ceiling and the crawlspace. I convinced the owner that there was little sense in having walls of R48 and the rest of the envelope at R16/32, and the attic in this house is in the thermal building envelope also:
http://www.e-woodshop.net/images/13525-7.jpg
The cost for this "icynene" type insulation was about three times the cost of traditional batting or blown in cellulose.
We contemplated going for LEEDS certification on this particular house, but although I'm absolutely certain it would qualify as it now stands, the owner left the original planning in the hands of an unqualified "builder/designer" and much of LEEDS certification is based on Energy Star rating requirements, which have to be taken into consideration in the planning stage and require third party participation, which the original "builder/designer" failed to apply to.
It's a shame, as I would like to have had a LEEDS house under my belt and this was an excellent opportunity to do so.
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"Tom Watson" wrote:

A few years ago, PBS covered the total construction of a "straw bale house".
Can't remember the details, but based on costs at the time, the cost differential was recovered in something like 5-8 years.
If I were to build today, fabrication of complete panels in a production shop, assembled on the jobsite with a crane and crew, ala the This Old House program, would get a very close look.
Lew
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"Lew Hodgett" wrote

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wrote:

That's a gimme for most. But Lew is in the tropics.
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"Lee Michaels" wrote:

Especially since in the floor hydronic heating would be specified.
Lew
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Lee Michaels wrote:

I like the way you think! :)
With R-48 insulation, it wouldn't take much panel area to keep the place cozy all through the winter - and since the panels operate in the 110F temperature range (slightly higher temperatures at higher altitudes - to a max operating temperature of 125F at 5,000 feet) there'd be no fire hazard from the heating system.
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Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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They don't last long. Martin
Lew Hodgett wrote:

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Martin H. Eastburn wrote:

Your ignorance is showing ...

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Isn't straw a mold magnet?
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-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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Decomposes and mold and mildew and rodents to say a few. Yes and I'm told on another show those straw bale homes are failing and won't last for years.
Martin
-MIKE- wrote:

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A strawbale house built in the right place to tested and proven standards (they've been doing it for roughly a hundred years) will show your concerns to be completely baseless. If it's built incorrectly i'm sure it will fail, much like any other construction. What show did you see this on?
I've spent 35 years so far visiting an eccentric aunts bale house and it's never had a single issue. I've been through, over and around another bale house that is solid and intact at 60 years old.
I'm not trying to convince you to build one, in fact i'd prefer you didn't, just giving you another point of view.
Y.
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Tom Watson wrote:

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"You can lead them to LINUX
but you can't make them THINK"
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"Swingman" wrote

conscious....., and sustainable....., and GREEEEEEEEEEEENNN!!!!
Pardon me while go someplace and vomit.
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On Thu, 16 Jul 2009 19:17:55 -0400, "Lee Michaels"

Nah, hay is green. Straw is sorta yellow brown.
Regards,
Tom Watson http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1 /
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Lee Michaels wrote:

Your forgot EXPENSIVE ... there is nothing in the building trade that is both "green" and inexpensive ... nothing!
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NOT even Red Bull!
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wrote:Snip

I gotta tell you, it's a slippery slope. I got the CT22 Festool Vac with the Domino, it was recommended by Festool dealer, LOL. Then on Robatoy's recommendation on the Festool Rotex Sander I got one to replace my 20 year old PC right angle ROS. When I saw how much dust "there wasn't" after sanding I naturally had to replace my PC SpeedBloc sander also I was/am threw with sanding dust. It takes some getting used to, not seeing any dust on the work and the paper looking brand new when it is worn out.
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