Rockler Visit

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They look awesome.
(i still wish that you would not run those vertical's all the way to the top - don't look natcheral to me :-) )
The thing that got me going was the "NO DUST" part.
I'm gonna have to take a look at these Fusstools.
You boys are rockin'!
Regards,
Tom Watson http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1 /
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Tom Watson wrote:

LOL ... Yep, I agree. But, being forced to build cabinets months before a structure even exists ain't exactly a "natcheral" endeavor, Tom
... and individual boxes, face frames clamped and screwed together side by side, do tend to look that way.
Not to mention - staring this in the face, with a schedule to meet and dimensions changing with every coat of plaster:
http://www.e-woodshop.net/images/13525-0.jpg
... and you do what you gotta do. :)
IOW, you ain't done nothing till you've tried your hand at designing/building/hanging cabinets on the walls of a "straw bale" house!
Don't ask ... it definitely ain't "natcheral". :)
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You know...just looking at that makes me start to itch.
Why would anyone want to live in a house made from stuff that god intended for cows and horses to shit in?
Regards,
Tom Watson http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1 /
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Tom Watson wrote:

... and costs approximately 30% more to build than traditional construction.
R48 insulation value is not justification enough for me.
That said, damned few people have accomplished this, and with "green building" coming to the fore around these parts, I'm now more than eminently qualified to get my share of the business ... if I should chose to do so. BTDT, literally from the ground up.
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Swingman wrote:

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"You can lead them to LINUX
but you can't make them THINK"
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wrote:

And a construction/mortgage loan?
Tom Veatch Wichita, KS USA
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Tom Veatch wrote:

Apparently it's covered in the International Building Code so neither permits nor loans should be an issue in areas where that code applies.
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J. Clarke wrote:

You're indeed correct. In fact, many municipalities have straw bale construction codes in areas of the country where it is feasible to build them. The house in question, while not yet finished, has passed all local and IRC foundation, framing, and mechanical inspections and is in strict compliance with local building codes ... AAMOF, it far exceeds them. The construction loan was not a problem, and a mortgage has been obtained.
There is understandably a good deal of ignorance regarding the method, much of it seen in the posts right here, and misconceptions regarding fire, vermin, and mold are common, but just that - misconceptions based on ignorance.
http://www.greenhomebuilding.com/pdf/buildingstandards_strawbale.pdf
While I would not build one for myself, after building one for a client my perception of the construction method has changed to one of provisional acceptance(post and beam, infill, construction, only) providing the owner is prepared for the additional cost.
AAMOF, if I hadn't let the cat out of the bag, the fact that this particular kitchen was destined for a house with straw bale walls, it is doubtful if even the most observant would have guessed from the photos.
As a plus, many of these straw bale homes are downright beautiful artworks themselves, particularly if you are a fan of Southwestern architecture (I'm not, but it is growing on me):
http://www.strawbale.com/straw-bale-photos/album/72157601046087576/straw-bale-residence.html
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"Swingman" wrote

WHAT??? You don't like southwestern style architecture????
My wife and I love it. Of course, we spent a weekend together in a southwestern style house in Carlsbad, CA. Sorta fell in love there and got married soon after. That was about 27 years ago. Beautiful house, beautiful relationship, etc.
<wipe away tear>
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Lee Michaels wrote:

Yep! ... that kind of experience definitely has a bearing on your style of architecture ... Linda and I did precisely the same in NOLA, thus our home:
http://www.e-woodshop.net/images/homesweethome.jpg
"Beautiful house, beautiful relationship ..." <G>
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Swingman | 2009-07-16 | 6:23:07 PM wrote:

I looked into straw bale construction for a garden wall a couple of years ago. Texas was in the middle of a drought at the time, so bales were expensive if you could even find them. The client lived next to a busy street, and she wanted a wall to deaden traffic noise.
Long story short, an eight-foot-tall 90-foot-long straw bale fence would be more than $20,000 dollars. * concrete footer with four-foot re-bar sticking up and galvanized nails sticking down at soil level * straw bales stacked in running bond to eight feet (speared on re-bar) * chicken wire covering bales and cinched to nails in footer * stucco covering all
Trivia for today: Hay and straw bales are the same thing, except hay includes the seed heads.
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SteveBell wrote:

Nope ... "hay" has nutritional value and is used for fodder, "straw" very little nutritional value and is primarily used for bedding.
http://extension.osu.edu/~news/story.php?id 1
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"Swingman" wote:

Glad to see you used The Ohio State University as a source<G>.
Lew
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SteveBell wrote:
... snip

Umm, no. Straw bales are typically wheat straw after threshing, that much is true. Hay, however, is feed that includes green dried plants such as alfalfa, clover, timothy, bermuda, and other grasses. One can say that grains with the head intact could technically be included as "hay", but I've never heard that usage unless the grain was cut green before fully maturing.
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Which is sometimes done. When a field is newly seeded with alfalfa, the plants need some protection from the sun for the first two or three months until they're well established. It's common to sow oats along with the alfalfa seed; the oats sprout earlier and grow faster, providing modest shade to the alfalfa seedlings. By the time the alfalfa is ready to cut and bale, the oats have not yet matured and so they get mown green, with immature grain heads, and raked and baled along with the alfalfa. The result is called "oats hay." And if you're planning to store it in a barn for more than a few months, you'd better have a *lot* of cats, because you're going to have a lot of mice. DAMHIKT.
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Doug Miller wrote:

Out here in wheat country it's common practice to bale wheat if have had significant hail damage or a late freeze so it won't make enough grain to make worth going to harvest. Or, will also pasture past jointing time with intent of baling for feed to get thru until other feed is available in spring.
Many alternatives but definitely true that "hay" and "straw" aren't the same thing at all...
In essence, straw is the stalk of a fully-ripened plant, the residue left over after threshing as noted above. It has little nutrient value and is totally unpalatable even if it did (think chewing on a straw or toothpick to make a meal).
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Doug Miller wrote:

LOL ... a country boy, without doubt! Your experience, unlike some of the other posts in this thread, obviously did not come solely from the rural areas of the Internet! :)
Wheat straw, which is the most desired for straw bale construction, has so little nutritional value that even the critters won't choose it as a desirable place to be. IME, leave it stacked in a barn for months and you will see relatively few rodents and crawling critters residing around the stack compared to a hay.
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"Swingman" wrote:

Where I grew up, and "thrashing" was still common, the straw was piled outside next to the barn in the pen where the cows were kept at night.
A mental block, can remember the proper name of that stack of straw.
Lew
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:-)
Another thing worth mentioning about oats hay: the bales are *heavy* when you put them in the barn -- there's probably a peck or so of grain in each square bale. Six months later, they don't weigh nearly so much: the mice are very efficient at finding the grain.

Yep, I'd agree with that.
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Doug Miller wrote:

Where we lived, it was common that one could actually harvest the grain from the nurse crop -- the alfalfa didn't grow fast enough to overtake the grain.

:-)
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