Rockler Visit

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I had some business near the local Rockler store today and dropped in for a visit. I haven't been in there for awhile. A lot more tools there now.
When I walked in the door, therre was the big, new Delta table saw. It looked nice and cost about $3,300. What was most interesting to me was a signt hat screamed out, "New Unisaw BUILT IN AMERICA!"
I thought that was interesting that US manufacture was considered a marketing point. Also, I didn't know that they still built saws here. I thought they went offshore. I wonder if they finally figured out that many people weren't going to buy a chinese copy of a unisaw.
Another interesting display was the Festools. Talk about getting tool envy. I saw the Festool sliding miter saw. I looked at the price and it said $130. I thought that this could not be right. I looked closer and someone had bent the little sign showing the price. I straightened it out and it said $1300. OK, that is more like it. Obviously somebody's idea of a joke. I was about to buy it even if I already had a miter saw.
Another thing that became obvious looking at the Festool catalog. You can spend a $1,000 or more for a basic tool. Then you can spend $20,000 for accessories and consumables! They getcha coming and going.
I drooled a little more, grabbed a catalog and went to my next appointment. Gotta go eat now. My honey is making up some of her world famous barbecued chicken pizza..
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On Jul 15, 10:16 pm, "Lee Michaels"

Better than a visit to a strip-joint, eh Lee?
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"Robatoy" wrote

You know you are getting old when tools are at least as exciting as naked, gyrating women. And you don't get slapped if you fondle the tools either! Both are expensive though.
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can
More expensive than any strip joint I've ever been to and that includes drinks and the stuffing of money in a stripper's g-string.
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Built in America, IIRC many of the parts are made in other counties.

Festool may be way more tool than you need as far as quality and longetivity are concerned. I know it certainly is that way for me however I do own 4 Festool Power tools. Yesterday I sanded the face frames of an entire large kitchen, 22 cabinets 120 grit, 150 grit, and 180 grit in about 2.5 hours and left no dust behind during the job.
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I, too suspect "BUILT" is the key word. I'll bet many of the parts came from China. Especially castings. I also have to wonder if, at $3,300, it is four times the saw as my eight year old Grizzly 1023S. (OK, before you do the inflation thing on me, three+ times better than currently priced 1023S).
When I started looking for cabinet saws 8-9 years ago I thought it was going to be easy. I grew up around old Unisaws and figured I would just buy one, until I saw the new ones. They weren't the same saws. Other than looking a lot different, I hope the new Unisaw is truly a better machine that is worth that kind of money.
RonB
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At $ 3300.00, A Unisaur would be in the neighbourhood of a SawStop. By all accounts an excellent saw. Then there are a few General saws to choose from in that price-range. There are too many other saws in that price bracket, including a Festool plunge with table and tracks.
If I was without saw and had to make a $3K decision, I think I would re-learn my way of doing things and go track.
Also, $3K buys a nice restorable Altendorf or SCM slider.
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Actually, when I saw the first pictures of the new Unisaw my mind clicked over to Craftsman of the mid-70's. That is when they started selling gimmicks and appearance stuff and quit building a descent grade of power tools. I know that is not appropriate for the new Deltas (I hope) but that was an impression. Those handwheels are an attention getter.
RonB
RonB
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No, I think the saw is way over priced for what you are getting. It is purdy but so is the SawStop for a few hundred more and you get a lot lot more safety for your buck. IMHO the new Unisaw is still running 3rd place behind the latest offferings from SawStop and Powermatic.

My money was going towards the Unisaw 10 years ago utlil the 2 dealers that carried Delta and Jet pointed me toward the Jet and then one of the dealers pointed out the broken trunion on the Unisaw display model. I still have the Jet.
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Yep, I gotta agree. I was up at the Woodcraft store yesterday... big ol' SawStop cabinet saw on display right inside the door. It was all I could do to not drool on it... Nice piece of gear, that. Very solid and well-made. And as soon as I saw "$3,300" in that post I thought, Why? Why spend that on a Unisaw when you can get a SawStop for basically the same price? It's an outstanding saw, better IMO than the Unisaw even if it did *not* have the safety feature.
SawStop is going to eat Delta for lunch in the table saw market.
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"Doug Miller" wrote

What is this thing of putting a big peice of drool worthy equipment right inside the front door? Does that loosen up the wallets or something?
I haven't seen a Sawstop up close and personal. Maybe I should wander down to Woodcraft and take a look. Refresh my memory somebody. Where are the Sawstops made?
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Tie-won but engeneered in America
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:-)
Taiwan, IIRC, but I'm not sure.
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wrote:

Actually I think the appearance of quality control looks to be a notch up from American, think Japanese. I honestly don't think I have seen any American machinery look this good.
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wrote:

1967 Camero Rally Sport - first NEW car my wife and I owned. Easy to work on, power out the ying yang, but a little cramped for a family on the road. Sold it with 120,000 miles on the odometer and in excellent condition. The engine (327) was still tight with good even compression and essentially zero oil consumption. Got more than I paid for it new. Feeding it high octane leaded fuel might be a little inconvenient these days, but wish I still had it.
Tom Veatch Wichita, KS USA
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Tom Veatch wrote:

That series of engines was nigh unto indestructible -- 327, 350, etc The bodies would fall down around the engines before they failed.

--
If you're going to be dumb, you better be tough

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Likewise the Chrysler slant-six. Had several of those in the 70s and 80s. Just change the oil regularly, and a slant-six will run forever.
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But it's more then just reliability, it is also the "feel" of the car. When I'm in an American car it just feels loose and unresponsive. We built are share of great muscle cars, but those days have been gone for too many years to thing about. My first car was a '65 Mustang, and of course I loved it. I now drive an '02 Mini Cooper S with 175k on it. This was the first new car I ever bought and it was number 166 off the line. Even with the "first rev" thing going against it I have had minimal problems. I got this with just about all the bells and whistles for ~24k and I would be hard pressed to find anything in the American stable in that price range that could come close to the engineering and fun.
I have to agree with Ron. The Unions, while at one time probably a good idea, basically destroyed an industry and essentially priced themselves out of business.
-Jim
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jtpryan wrote: ...

That all depends on the car and suspension choices, etc., ...
A Buick LeSabre (or whatever the present replacement is) doesn't have the same market niche as a whatever rice-burner...
I'll put my 300M equipped w/ the touring package against most any other touring sedan within reasonably comparable price range...
--
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I'll take that challange with my 07 Tundra. LOL
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